Sunday, May 26, 2019

Carpe Diem #1667 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (14) Hibiscus Red ... Raymond Roseliep


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome a the last week of our TRC month May 2019. I hope you all have had a wonderful week and a wonderful weekend. I had a very busy week, so I was glad that I had taken a week off. But today we are going on with our TRC month. This month I challenge you to create Tan Renga with a given haiku by classical and modern haiku poets.

Today I have chosen a nice haiku by a not so well known haiku poet, Raymond Roseliep (1917-1983). Let me give you first a short overview of his life:

Raymond Roseliep (1917 – 1983) was a poet and contemporary master of the English haiku and a Catholic priest. He has been described as "the John Donne of Western haiku."


Raymond Roseliep

Born on August 11, 1917, in Farley, Iowa, to John Albert Roseliep (1874-1939) and Anna Elizabeth Anderson (1884-1967). In 1939 he graduated from Loras College with a Bachelor of Arts, in 1948 he received a Master of Arts in English from Catholic University of America, and in 1954 he received a Doctor of Philosophy in English Literature from Notre Dame University. He was ordained, June 12, 1943, at St. Raphael’s Cathedral, Dubuque, Iowa.

For Raymond Roseliep the two most sacred themes were creation and love, so it was only natural that he would explore both in his haiku. In an interview first published in 1979, Roseliep was asked how a priest could be writing such evocative, sometimes erotic, love poetry. “To talk about that,” Roseliep said, “I should return for a moment to that Catholic-poetry period of mine, and I can briefly tell you how it was inevitable that I needed a fresh theme. In those early days I was writing about the Mass, the sacraments, parish experiences, religious encounters of all dimensions — in people, nature, anywhere.” He added: “I needed a new outlook. I knew that religious poetry and love poetry are the hardest of all to write, and since I hadn’t attained full success in one, I would try the other. And I have been exploring the love theme ever since. It’s wonderful. It keeps me alive and young and remembering; and always with feelings that are deepest and most sacred in all of us.”(Delta Epsilon Sigma Bulletin24:4 (December 1979);A Roseliep Retrospective: Poems & Other Words By & About Raymond Roseliep (Ithaca, N.Y.: Alembic Press, 1980), 13.)


Morning Glory

He won the Haiku Society of America Harold G. Henderson award in 1977 and 1982. In 1981, Roseliep's haiku sequence, “The Morning Glory”, appeared on over two thousand buses in New York City:

takes in 
the world 
from the heart out 

funnels 
our day 
into itself 

closes 
on its own 
inner light

© Raymond Roseliep

I have to admit ... I never had heard of this haiku poet until today, but his haiku are really gorgeous and mostly written in a nice "free-styling" way ... a way of haiku-ing I like as you all (maybe) know. At the end of this episode I will give you a few links to more information about him, but first I will give you the haiku to work with:

unable
to get hibiscus red
the artist eats the flower

© Raymond Roseliep

More about Raymond Roseliep you can fnd at:


This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until June 2nd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Saturday, May 25, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #86 A New Feature ... Carpe Diem's Utopia


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday May 26th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First I have to apologize for being late with publishing of this weekend meditation, but it has all to do with a new feature I have created "Carpe Diem's Utopia". Let me first give you an explanation about this new feature, but to do that I need to tell you first what "Utopia" was meant to be.

A Utopia is an imagined community or society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens. The opposite of a utopia is a dystopia. One could also say that utopia is a perfect "place" that has been designed so there are no problems.


Carpe Diem's Utopia (image credits)

Utopia focuses on equality in economics, government and justice, though by no means exclusively, with the method and structure of proposed implementation varying based on ideology. According to Lyman Tower Sargent "there are socialist, capitalist, monarchical, democratic, anarchist, ecological, feminist, patriarchal, egalitarian, hierarchical, racist, left-wing, right-wing, reformist, Naturism/Nude Christians, free love, nuclear family, extended family, gay, lesbian and many more utopias [...] Utopianism, some argue, is essential for the improvement of the human condition. But if used wrongly, it becomes dangerous. Utopia has an inherent contradictory nature here." Sargent argues that utopia's nature is inherently contradictory, because societies are not homogenous and have desires which conflict and therefore cannot simultaneously be satisfied. If any two desires cannot be simultaneously satisfied, true utopia cannot be attained because in utopia all desires are satisfied.

It's a dreamworld I think, but it can be of use for our haiku writing skills, because that's the task of this new feature ... creating an utopian (excellent) haiku (or tanka) by using the classical rules as you can find above in the CD Lecture 1.

A nice task from a modern view. The haiku or tanka have to have a modern theme, but has to follow the classical rules.

driving me home
her sportscar flashes along the roads
daffodils bow their head


© Chèvrefeuille

Just a small impromptu verse to show the goal for this task. Can you see the modern theme? and the classical rules?

Well ... a nice challenge I think. This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday May 26th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until June 2nd at noon (CEST). Have fun ... and ofcourse a wonderful weekend.


Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Carpe Diem Extra May 22nd 2019 -- forgotten kukai August 2018


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

As you all know I have a week off, but that doesn't mean I am not busy with Carpe Diem. I ran into a "lost list of the 2nd Troiku-kukai". That 2nd Troiku-kukai we had in August 2018. So I will gather those Troiku and will publish them this week for judging.

My apologies for this inconvenience.

Namasté,

Chèvrefeuille, your host


Friday, May 17, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #85 Photo-shopping Haiku (2) Cherry Blossom


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday May 19th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new CDHK Weekend Meditation. That special feature that gives you the opportunity to meditate and contemplate before you can submit your response. Before I give you the new "weekend meditation" task I have an announcement to make.

As you maybe remember ... last month I took a week off ... That gave me the opportunity to take a rest and have more time for those around me. I also told you last month that I will take a week off every month and next week is that week. This weekend meditation is the start of this week off and next Friday May 24th I will publish our new weekend meditation. So next week I will not publish our regular episodes. It gives you also time to take your time to respond without the pressure of a new episode every day.

Okay back to this weekend meditation. Several weeks ago I intoduced to you a new feature here at CDHK "Photo-Shopping Haiku". (description of this new feature HERE).


Cherry Blossom

For this weekend meditation "Photo-Shopping Haiku" I have chosen a beautiful haiku to "photo-shop" by Kobayashi Issa:

even an old man
has New Year's eyes...
cherry blossoms

© Kobayashi Issa (Tr. David G. Lanoue)

Give it a thought and try to 'photo-shop" it to a "better version of itself" just by "a little change". Have fun!

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday May 19th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 26th at noon (CEST). Have a wonderful weekend!


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1666 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (13) dangling prayer beads


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. Yesterday I gave you a hineri episode with gorgeous haiku crafted by Jane Reichhold. Today I have chosen a beauty by one of the Big Five Haiku Masters, Kobayashi Issa, to work with.

During lack of time I will give you only the haiku to work with:

prayer beads dangling
a harvest moon prayer...
mountain home

© Kobayashi Issa

Prayer Beads Dangling
This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 23rd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1665 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (12) "special" Basho "Miscanthus bud"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a "special" episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. Today I have a few nice haiku by Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) for you to work with. You may choose a haiku to work with of you can use them all. Why is this episode "special"? Well I realised today that this year Basho's birth and death are celebrated. He was born 325 years ago and died 375 years ago, so in my opinion this is "special".

I will give you a short overview of his life hereafter:

Matsuo Bashō (1644–1694), born, then Matsuo Chūemon Munefusa, was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in the collaborative haikai no renga form; today, after centuries of commentary, he is recognized as the greatest master of haiku (then called hokku). Matsuo Bashō's poetry is internationally renowned; and, in Japan, many of his poems are reproduced on monuments and traditional sites. Although Bashō is justifiably famous in the West for his hokku, he himself believed his best work lay in leading and participating in renku. He is quoted as saying, "Many of my followers can write hokku as well as I can. Where I show who I really am is in linking haikai verses."

Matsuo Basho (1644-1694)

Bashō was introduced to poetry at a young age, and after integrating himself into the intellectual scene of Edo (modern Tokyo) he quickly became well known throughout Japan. He made a living as a teacher; but then renounced the social, urban life of the literary circles and was inclined to wander throughout the country, heading west, east, and far into the northern wilderness to gain inspiration for his writing. His poems were influenced by his firsthand experience of the world around him, often encapsulating the feeling of a scene in a few simple elements. (Source: wikipedia)

Here are the haiku to work with:

the Dutchmen, too,
kneel before His Lordship --
spring under His reign.


by my new banana plant
the first sign of something I loathe --
a miscanthus bud!



Miscanthus

another year is gone
a traveler's shade on my head,
straw sandals at my feet


now then, let's go out
to enjoy the snow ... until
I slip and fall!


© Basho

Four very nicely crafted haiku by my master, Matsuo Basho. You may choose from these four to create Tan Renga with or you can use them all. That's up to you.

This "special" episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 22nd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1664 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (11) Tan Renga Hineri "Only Tracks"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Here is our delayed post as mentioned yesterday. Today I love to challenge you to create a Tan Renga Hineri. That means: I will give you a haiku to work with. You have to add a minimum of three stanza and a maximum of five stanza. You have to create the 2nd stanza, the 3rd stanza (a haiku) and a 4th stanza (two lined). If you are inspired enough than you can add also a fifth stanza (a haiku) and a 6th stanza (two lined). Try to create a "short story" and try to "close the chain" with a "ageku" (closing verse) that refers to the 1st (given) stanza.

Footsteps On The Beach (image found on pxhere)

Today I have a beautiful haiku by Jane Reichhold (1937-2016) to work with. Try to create your Tan Renga Hineri in honor of her.

late summer
alone on the beach
with only tracks

© Jane Reichhold

I think this haiku is a beauty to work with. It has so many scenes hidden in it ...

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 21st at noon (CEST). I will publish our new episode immediately hereafter.