Friday, January 18, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #68 Tan Renga With Jane Reichhold "her gentle spirit"


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new weekend meditation, that special feature for the weekend here at CDHK. Today, January 18th, Jane would have become 82 yrs. You all know that she decided to end her life herself, because she couldn't longer live with the pain of fibromyalgia ... so this weekend I will reshare an episode of our month in honor of Jane back in 2016:




Today I have chosen another nice modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", a complete saijiki in which Jane gathered modern kigo and gave examples of all those modern kigo by creating wonderful haiku. Today I hope to inspire you with calm through the following haiku by Jane:

a certain calm
in summer's passing
flowers

flat seas
with the butterfly's flight
a certain calm

the hour silent
before the birds awake
waves on sand

© Jane Reichhold

These haiku are wonderful and I can read Jane's fingerprints all over them. In a way Jane Reichhold created the "western" haiku without losing the respect for the Japanese haiku. She created beauty and shared it with the world. Without her the "western" haiku had died long ago, but that's my humble opinion.



As I read the above trio of haiku I felt Jane's presence and that inspired me to create the following haiku:

her gentle spirit
the calm of an early morning
a bird's song

© Chèvrefeuille

I love this haiku ... one of my best I would say (how immodest) ... Jane and I are connected in a very nice spiritual way and I hope to feel her presence forever.

The challenge for this weekend meditation is to create Tan Renga with the above three given haiku by Jane Reichhold. A Tan Renga looks like a Tanka, but is written by two poets instead of one poet. It's a kind of chained poem. You have to create the second stanza of each Tan Renga. (See also above in the menu)

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 27th at noon (CET). Have a great weekend!


Thursday, January 17, 2019

Carpe Diem #1587 Buson's Memorial Day (busonki) (January 17th)

 

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. Today it's January 17th and that is Buson's Memorial Day (or busonki) and it's also a classical kigo for winter. So according to the meaning of this day ... Buson's Memorial Day ... I have a nice challenge for you all ... create a "fusion-ku" from the two haiku I will give you hereafter ... and create a Troiku with your "fusion-ku".

Here are the two haiku by Buson to use:

someone goes by wearing a hood
in his own darkness
not seeing the harvest moon

the first light snow
then when the bowl of the sky is empty
the moon hanging in the bamboos

© Yosa Buson

Haiga by Buson
Two nice haiku by Buson, but Buson was also a great Haiga painter as you can see above. He illustrated the first bound edition of Basho's "Oku No Hosomichi" (Small Road Into The Deep North).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 24th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1586 withered leaves


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

"Withered leaves" is our modern kigo for today's episode. It's taken from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" section: winter, subsection: plants. A wonderful modern kigo to work with I think so no further explanation needed.

Withered Leaves
And to awaken your muses ... here are a few haiku extracted from Jane's Saijiki as examples for this modern kigo:

up to a branch
wind took a winter leaf
let it fall again

snow
cooling the colors
withered leaves

frost spikes
the growing cold
of withered leaves

© Jane Reichhold

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 23rd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our next episode later on.


Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1585 icicles (tsurara)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. The place to be if you like to write and share haiku or other kinds of Japanese poetry. This month we are exploring modern and classical seasonwords for winter. And today I have a nice classical kigo (seasonword) for you.

The prompt for today is Icicles (tsurara) and that's a classical kigo for "late winter", but in my opinion that's not completely true, because Icicles we see through whole winter.

I have found a wonderful haiku on 'icicles' written by Issa:

yûkaze ya yashiro no tsurara hi no utsuru

night wind --
the shrine's icicles
reflect the lights

© Kobayashi Issa

Icicles (image found on Pixabay)

Well ... now it's my turn ...

icicles hanging
at the gutter of the old mansion
sun's reflections

© Chèvrefeuille

I think icicles are the most beautiful thing of winter, they are so fragile and look like crystals.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 22nd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1584 Winter Renga With Jane Reichhold -- spots of blue


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. Sorry for being this late, but I hadn't time to publish it on time. This month we are exploring modern and classical seasonwords (kigo) for winter and today I have six modern kigo for you to work with. All kigo are taken from Jane Reichhold's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku" and are all from the section Winter, subsection Celestial.

Today I love to challenge you to create a renga with Jane Reichhold. I will give you six haiku written by her to work with (including the six modern kigo) and create a renga with. As you all know in this feature you can choose your own "line-up" of the given haiku and you have to add the two lined stanza between them. Try to make the "chain" complete by using the "hokku" and the "ageku" rule, that means the last stanza, the ageku, has to be connected to the first stanza, the hokku, through association.


Here are the six modern kigo I have chosen: air, dawn, moon, stars, first light and sunset. And here are the haiku to work with:

frost sharp air
cut into pieces by sunshine
sparkling on snow 

winter dawn
sounds of blowing snow
sleeping birds 

spots of blue
varying the light to fit
tracks in the snow 


Tracks In The Snow

cold winds
rounding snow-capped peaks
a full moon 

before one star
beams from the lighthouse
search the sky 

ocean sunset
staying by the window
'till the color sinks 

© Jane Reichhold (Extracted from "A Dictinary of Haiku")

Six wonderful haiku by Jane to work with. Take the opportunity to create a renga together with Jane Reichhold in honor of her. She is still missed.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 21st at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, January 13, 2019

Carpe Diem #1583 winter seclusion (fuyugomori)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the new week ... I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend and that you all have found the inspiration for our tough challenge "Troiku Hineri".

This month we are exploring the kigo for winter, not only classical but also modern kigo are the themes this month. Before the weekend we had a modern kigo by Jane Reichhold so today it's time for a classical kigo.

Today this classical kigo you can use during the whole winter, or as the classical Saijiki all say "All Winter". Winter Seclusion (fuyugomori) is our kigo today. I think it needs no explanation, but I have found a nice haiku with this kigo by Matsuo Basho. He wrote this haiku at the age of 45.

Fuyugomori (Winter Seclusion)
In rural Japan, especially in the Northern areas along the coast of the Sea of Japan, the winter is long and brings enormous amounts of snow. There was nothing much to do that sit back and wait it out. The farmhouses where difficult to heat and the family huddled around the hearth (irori) in the kitchen. It was a tough time to live through with great endurance. This is what we call winter seclusion, really a tough time.

Here is the haiku I mentioned above:

sashikomoru mugura no tomo kabuna uri

winter seclusion
the only friend to rely on
grass stuffed mattres

© Basho (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

A nice classical haiku I think, my translation is a way of free-styling, because "sashikomoru" means actually "staying indoors", but in my opinion that's almost the same as "fuyugomori" (winter seclusion).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 20th at noon (CET). Tomorrow we will have another nice modern kigo taken from Jane's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku". For now ... have fun!


Friday, January 11, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #67 Troiku Hineri: Apple Blossoms


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday January 13th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new edition of our CDHK Weekend Meditation. Earlier I promised you to follow the Pan American Highway in our weekend meditations this month, but I have decided to leave the Pan American Highway and give you another challenge for this weekend.

We have done this more often here at CDHK so here is your task for this weekend meditation: I will give you four haiku to work with. You may decide which haiku you want to use to create a "fusion-ku" with. Of course the "crossroads-idea" is not the only thing you have to do. I love to challenge you to create a Troiku Hineri with your "fusion-ku". What is a "Troiku Hineri"? Well let me try to explain that:

Logo Troiku Hineri

As you all know a Troiku starts with a haiku and the following three haiku start with the separated lines of the first haiku. In a "Troiku Hineri" (a Troiku with a twist) I challenge you to do the same with the three haiku following the "starter-haiku" of the Troiku. So you have to create nine new haiku with the separated lines of your first three haiku of the "regular Troiku". All together ... you have to create TWELVE new haiku and ofcourse your "fusion-ku". It's a tough challenge I think ... so take your time, meditate and contemplate on what you are going to share with us.

Here are the four haiku to work with, all haiku by Jane Reichhold and taken from her online Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku", Spring section:

light carried in my arms
apple blossoms from a neighbor
on my doorstep

clusters talking
together in admiration
apple blossoms

sun transformed
into apple blossoms
the ground is level

the dam is broken
spring cascades into valleys
as apple blossoms

© Jane Reichhold (1937-2016)

Peacock, Apple Blossom by Bairei Kono (1899) (image found on Pinterest)
Well ... a nice, but difficult challenge for this weekend I think. But I am confident that you all can do it. Have a great weekend!

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 13th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 20th at noon (CET).