Friday, April 19, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #81 Poetry Archive (5) ... loneliness or emptiness


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday April 21st at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

It's weekend again ... so time for a new weekend meditation, our special CDHK feature for the weekend to meditate and contemplate about a theme. This weekend I have chosen for a new episode of our Poetry Archive feature. This feature is about your archive. Choose a haiku, tanka or other form of Japanese poetry from your archive and share it with us all. Tell us why you have chosen for that poem from your archive and create a new poem inspired on your choice. This time I have another wonderful theme ... loneliness or emptiness ...

In an earlier post this month I told you all that I needed a week off. That week is now upcoming. I will not post new episodes this week, but of course I will give you a new weekend meditation at the end of this "free off-week". It gives me time to relax and it will give you the chance to relax too and inhale new energy.




Okay ... back to our weekend meditation ... Poetry Archive ... Loneliness or Emptiness ...

Here is a haiku from my archive(s) themed "loneliness" and one themed "emptiness":

in front of the fireplace
an empty bottle and broken wine glasses 
after the quarrel

an empty bowl
but in it is the spirit of emptiness -
the spring breeze

© Chèvrefeuille

Both haiku were responses on earlier posts here at CDHK. I like them both, but that second one I see as one of my masterpieces. It's a deep religious, spiritual, experience ... inspired on a "koan".


Loneliness

And here is a new one created from both of the haiku above, say a "fusion-ku":

smoldering fireplace
the sweet perfume of burned herbs
loneliness grabs my throat


© Chèvrefeuille

Have a wonderful weekend and a great week.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday April 21st at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until April 28th at noon (CEST). Have an awesome weekend!


Thursday, April 18, 2019

Carpe Diem #1651 dropwart (seri), Japanese parsley


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a wonderful spring day we have had here in The Netherlands. Whole day sunshine a really nice temperature ... it felt almost like a early summer day. Yes it was a gorgeous day. And I hope you all have had such a wonderful day too.

This month it's all about classical and non-classical kigo (seasonwords) for spring and today I have another nice classical kigo taken from the Shiki saijiki, dropwart (seri) or Japanese parsley.

Dropwart (Seri) (Japanese Parsley)
Dropwart is part a broad range of herbs, there are a lot of species of this parsley family. It's a spring kigo that is (was) used all spring, because it grows and blooms in all spring.

I have found a nice example for this classical kigo, a haiku by Yosa Buson (one of the "big five" haiku poets):

furudera ya houroku suteru seri no naka

By an old temple
a broken clay kitchen pot
in a field of water parsley


© Yosa Buson

And here is another "parsley"-haiku:

This is all there is;
the path comes to an end
among the parsley.


© Alan Watts

Two wonderful haiku I think as an example for this classical kigo for spring.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 25th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Carpe Diem #1650 Breakfast (modern kigo)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai were we are exploring the beauty of classical and non-classical kigo for spring. Today I haven't enough time to create a large episode, but I think I can make you all happy with a new "Renga With ... Jane Reichhold" episode.

Today I have chosen a modern kigo taken from her modern saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku" ... We have to do it every morning, but as I speak for myself ... I do not take breakfast every day. So today I challenge you to create a Renga With Jane Reichhold by adding your two-lined stanza between the haiku of Jane. In her modern saijiki she gives us six examples of haiku with the modern kigo "breakfast" and those six haiku I will give you to create your Renga With Jane.



Here are the six "breakfast"-haiku by Jane. You may choose your own "line-up":

flood waters crest
someone by the river puts water
in a coffee pot

breakfast coffee
the excitement of an ocean
in my cup

threads of smoke
breakfast fires of neighbors
tied together

pale spring sunshine
spread over breakfast toast
quince jelly

beating egg yolks
two yellow butterflies
twist in the fog

early morning rain
the dry sound inside the cabin
of oatmeal cooking

© Jane Reichhold (Extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku")

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 24th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1649 shining wind (kaze hikaru)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, the place to be if you like to create haiku, tanka or other Japanese poetry form, and share them with the world. This month we are exploring classical and non-classical kigo (seasonwords) for spring, And today I have another nice classical kigo for spring taken from the Shiki Saijiki, "shining wind (kaze hikaru).

It's a not so renown kigo and it needs a little bit of explanation. Shining wind (kaze hikaru) refers to  the sparkling of spring sunshine and a gentle wind on a sunny spring day.

Here is an example of the use of this kigo in a haiku:

kaze hikaru makoto no nata ni hanagoro mo

Wind shines
around truth's flag
and the symphony of flowers as well

© Taeko Watanabe. (*1960 -)


Katsushika Hokusai- Plum Blossom and the Moon

fragile green leaf
whispers in the shining wind
in early sunlight


© Chèvrefeuille

Well ... I am looking forward to your responses. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 23rd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Monday, April 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1648 skylark (hibari)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a wonderful spring day we had here in The Netherlands. It felt almost like early summer, I even could stay a while outside in the garden enjoying the warmth of the sun on my face. Yes ... it was an awesome spring day.

This month we are exploring classical and non-classical kigo for spring and today I have another wonderful classical kigo extracted from the Shiki saijiki for you all to work with. Our classical kigo for today is Hibari (Skylark).


Skylark (woodblock-print by Bijutsu Sekai (1803-1896)

And here are a few haiku from my archive:

mezzo-soprano sings
a love song by Chopin -
cry of a Skylark   

in touch with the gods
pine trees reaching for heaven -
skylarks sing their song

© Chèvrefeuille

And here is another example with this classical kigo created by Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), my sensei:

hibari naku naka no hyoshi ya kiji no koe

through the skylark's singing
comes the beat
of pheasants' cries

© Basho



Ofcourse I had to create a new one and that wasn't an easy task, but I think I succeeded with the following haiku:

high in the sky
the faint shadow of a skylark
hear! he praises the Creator


© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 22nd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Sunday, April 14, 2019

Carpe Diem #1647 Japanese-radish flower (daikon no hana)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend full of inspiration. I am looking forward to all of your wonderful "new masterpieces". Maybe you have written that masterpiece just a few minutes ago or maybe you have written it a while ago, but weren't sure of it was a masterpiece. Well ... in my opinion every haiku, tanka or other Japanese poetry form is a masterpiece, because you have written it. It was your experience with nature, that moment short as the sound of a pebble thrown into water.

This month we are exploring the classical and non-classical seasonwords for spring. Spring is the season of new life. Everywere you look you can see that new life, young green leaves, a diversity of blossoms and flowers ... birds creating their new nest ... to create new life.

wakaba shite    om me no shizuku    nuguwa baya

young leaves
I would like to wipe away
tears in your eyes

© Basho (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

Young Green Leaves
But let us take a look at our new spring kigo. Today I have chosen for a classical kigo taken from the Shiki saijiki, Japanese-radish flower (daikon no hana), but what kind of plant this is? I have ran through the Internet and found the following description of this plant.

Daikon literally means ‘big root’. This long white crunchy vegetable looks like horseradish, but it’s mild-flavored, similar to watercress. Daikon is also known as winter radish, oriental radish or Japanese radish. By itself, daikon radish is a superb vegetable. It’s a staple of Japanese food culture,  whether pickled, garnished, or served steaming in miso soup. Traditionally know as a yin food, it cools and calms the body.

Japanese-radish flowers (daikon no hana)
Here are a few examples for this classical kigo by my master Matsuo Basho:

kiku no ato daikon no hoka sara ni nashi

After the chrysanthemums,
Apart from radishes,
There is nothing.

mononofu no daikon nigaki hanashi kana

samurai's gathering--
their chat has the pungent taste
of daikon radish

© Matsuo Basho (1644-94)

And now ... it is up to you my dear CDHK family-members. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 21st at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Friday, April 12, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #80 Quest For A New Masterpiece ... summer grasses


!! open for your submissions next Sunday April 14th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Really time flies and certainly this week time wasn't on my side. I have had a very busy week, but could find some peace and relaxation in creating our wonderful Haiku Kai. What an every day joy it is to create CDHK for you my dear CDHK family members. And what a joy this month is, we are exploring classical and non-classical kigo (seasonwords) for spring ... yes it's a joy.

This weekend I love to challenge you (again) to create your masterpiece. Yes I have for you a new episode of our special feature "Quest For A New Masterpiece". As you all know there are several haiku that are renown all over the world, those haiku, like for example Basho's "Frogpond" and "Crow on a bare branch" are such masterpieces, but I know for sure that we all have the talent to create our own masterpieces.

Summer Grasses (canvas by Home Comforts)

This weekend I love to challenge you to create your masterpiece inspired on an other renown haiku by Matsuo Basho ... "summer grasses"

summer grasses
all that remains
of warriors’ dreams

© Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

Maybe you remember a haiku that I wrote inspired on this renown haiku by Basho:

ancient warriors ghosts
mists over the foreign highlands -
waiting for the full moon

© Chèvrefeuille

You all know I am more of the "freestyle" way of haikuing, but this one is according to the classical rules. That makes this "Quest" a little bit more difficult, because I love to challenge you to create your classical haiku in which you use the rules as you can read above in the menu in CD Lecture 1.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday April 14th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until April 21st at noon (CEST). So I hope you are inspired and for closure all that remains now is to wish you all a wonderful weekend.