Monday, January 21, 2019

Carpe Diem #1589 mandarin ducks (oshidori)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I had a busy day today so I have a reprise episode for you this time. Maybe you can remember that we have had "mandarin ducks" as a prompt several times here at CDHK. "Mandarin Ducks" is a classical kigo for winter and there are nice haiku with this kigo for example:

furu ike no oshidori ni yuki furu yuube kana

at the old pond
snow falls on Mandarin ducks
in twilight

© Matsuo Basho (1644-1694)

Or what do you think of this one by Yosa Buson:

oshidoriya ikeni otonaki kashino ame

mandarin duck -
rain falls silently
from an oak

© Yosa Buson (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

Mandarin Ducks
The adult male (sometimes called 'drake' for his colorful feathers) is a striking and unmistakable bird. It has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and "whiskers". The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange "sails" at the back. The female is similar to female Wood Duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill.
The Mandarin ducklings are almost identical in look to Wood ducklings, and appear very similar to Mallard ducklings. The ducklings can be distinguished from Mallard ducklings because the eye-stripe of Mandarin ducklings (and Wood ducklings) stops at the eye, while in Mallard ducklings it reaches all the way to the bill.

Here are a few haiku from my archive themed "Mandarin Ducks":

in the moonlight 
Mandarin Ducks making love
happily together

brilliant colors
reflecting in the old pond
Mandarin drake

© Chèvrefeuille

And here is another one, also from my archive, but more inspired on the beautiful colors of the Mandarin Duck:

without sound
colored leaves dive into
the city park pond

© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 28th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!


Sunday, January 20, 2019

Carpe Diem #1588 delight in company


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend full of inspiration. I had a nice weekend, relaxing and taking time with my loved ones. I really enjoy the time I can share with my loved ones and that's also the theme for this new episode.

This month we are exploring classical and modern kigo (seasonwords) for winter and today I have a nice modern kigo for you taken from Jane Reichhold's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku". And that modern kigo has everything to do with enjoying the company of loved ones ... the theme today is "delight in company" and that's very important for everyone I think.

Delight In Company (©photo Anna Ivanova)
Ofcourse "delight in company" is not specific for winter, but I think in winter we enjoy it more than in the other seasons. The evenings and nights are longer and mostly in this time of year we enjoy the romance of candlelight and soft music ...

I love this time of year and I am enjoying the company of my beloved ones. In her Saijiki Jane Reichhold gives us a few wonderful examples of haiku in which she uses this modern kigo. So here are a few of those haiku to awaken your muses.

a new winter friend
up the year's steep sloping
our flow of words

bird song
under winter quilts
bodies touching

curved ink
the warmth of your hand
in the letters

© Jane Reichhold (extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku")

By the way the first haiku of the above series she wrote for a friend.

fireplace (still from a you tube clip)

warm embrace
in front of the fireplace
I see stars

© Chèvrefeuille

A nice romantic haiku I think ... isn't that what delight in company can mean also?

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 27th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.

Friday, January 18, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #68 Tan Renga With Jane Reichhold "her gentle spirit"


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new weekend meditation, that special feature for the weekend here at CDHK. Today, January 18th, Jane would have become 82 yrs. You all know that she decided to end her life herself, because she couldn't longer live with the pain of fibromyalgia ... so this weekend I will reshare an episode of our month in honor of Jane back in 2016:




Today I have chosen another nice modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", a complete saijiki in which Jane gathered modern kigo and gave examples of all those modern kigo by creating wonderful haiku. Today I hope to inspire you with calm through the following haiku by Jane:

a certain calm
in summer's passing
flowers

flat seas
with the butterfly's flight
a certain calm

the hour silent
before the birds awake
waves on sand

© Jane Reichhold

These haiku are wonderful and I can read Jane's fingerprints all over them. In a way Jane Reichhold created the "western" haiku without losing the respect for the Japanese haiku. She created beauty and shared it with the world. Without her the "western" haiku had died long ago, but that's my humble opinion.



As I read the above trio of haiku I felt Jane's presence and that inspired me to create the following haiku:

her gentle spirit
the calm of an early morning
a bird's song

© Chèvrefeuille

I love this haiku ... one of my best I would say (how immodest) ... Jane and I are connected in a very nice spiritual way and I hope to feel her presence forever.

The challenge for this weekend meditation is to create Tan Renga with the above three given haiku by Jane Reichhold. A Tan Renga looks like a Tanka, but is written by two poets instead of one poet. It's a kind of chained poem. You have to create the second stanza of each Tan Renga. (See also above in the menu)

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 27th at noon (CET). Have a great weekend!


Thursday, January 17, 2019

Carpe Diem #1587 Buson's Memorial Day (busonki) (January 17th)

 

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. Today it's January 17th and that is Buson's Memorial Day (or busonki) and it's also a classical kigo for winter. So according to the meaning of this day ... Buson's Memorial Day ... I have a nice challenge for you all ... create a "fusion-ku" from the two haiku I will give you hereafter ... and create a Troiku with your "fusion-ku".

Here are the two haiku by Buson to use:

someone goes by wearing a hood
in his own darkness
not seeing the harvest moon

the first light snow
then when the bowl of the sky is empty
the moon hanging in the bamboos

© Yosa Buson

Haiga by Buson
Two nice haiku by Buson, but Buson was also a great Haiga painter as you can see above. He illustrated the first bound edition of Basho's "Oku No Hosomichi" (Small Road Into The Deep North).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 24th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1586 withered leaves


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

"Withered leaves" is our modern kigo for today's episode. It's taken from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" section: winter, subsection: plants. A wonderful modern kigo to work with I think so no further explanation needed.

Withered Leaves
And to awaken your muses ... here are a few haiku extracted from Jane's Saijiki as examples for this modern kigo:

up to a branch
wind took a winter leaf
let it fall again

snow
cooling the colors
withered leaves

frost spikes
the growing cold
of withered leaves

© Jane Reichhold

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 23rd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our next episode later on.


Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1585 icicles (tsurara)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. The place to be if you like to write and share haiku or other kinds of Japanese poetry. This month we are exploring modern and classical seasonwords for winter. And today I have a nice classical kigo (seasonword) for you.

The prompt for today is Icicles (tsurara) and that's a classical kigo for "late winter", but in my opinion that's not completely true, because Icicles we see through whole winter.

I have found a wonderful haiku on 'icicles' written by Issa:

yûkaze ya yashiro no tsurara hi no utsuru

night wind --
the shrine's icicles
reflect the lights

© Kobayashi Issa

Icicles (image found on Pixabay)

Well ... now it's my turn ...

icicles hanging
at the gutter of the old mansion
sun's reflections

© Chèvrefeuille

I think icicles are the most beautiful thing of winter, they are so fragile and look like crystals.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 22nd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1584 Winter Renga With Jane Reichhold -- spots of blue


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. Sorry for being this late, but I hadn't time to publish it on time. This month we are exploring modern and classical seasonwords (kigo) for winter and today I have six modern kigo for you to work with. All kigo are taken from Jane Reichhold's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku" and are all from the section Winter, subsection Celestial.

Today I love to challenge you to create a renga with Jane Reichhold. I will give you six haiku written by her to work with (including the six modern kigo) and create a renga with. As you all know in this feature you can choose your own "line-up" of the given haiku and you have to add the two lined stanza between them. Try to make the "chain" complete by using the "hokku" and the "ageku" rule, that means the last stanza, the ageku, has to be connected to the first stanza, the hokku, through association.


Here are the six modern kigo I have chosen: air, dawn, moon, stars, first light and sunset. And here are the haiku to work with:

frost sharp air
cut into pieces by sunshine
sparkling on snow 

winter dawn
sounds of blowing snow
sleeping birds 

spots of blue
varying the light to fit
tracks in the snow 


Tracks In The Snow

cold winds
rounding snow-capped peaks
a full moon 

before one star
beams from the lighthouse
search the sky 

ocean sunset
staying by the window
'till the color sinks 

© Jane Reichhold (Extracted from "A Dictinary of Haiku")

Six wonderful haiku by Jane to work with. Take the opportunity to create a renga together with Jane Reichhold in honor of her. She is still missed.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 21st at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, January 13, 2019

Carpe Diem #1583 winter seclusion (fuyugomori)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the new week ... I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend and that you all have found the inspiration for our tough challenge "Troiku Hineri".

This month we are exploring the kigo for winter, not only classical but also modern kigo are the themes this month. Before the weekend we had a modern kigo by Jane Reichhold so today it's time for a classical kigo.

Today this classical kigo you can use during the whole winter, or as the classical Saijiki all say "All Winter". Winter Seclusion (fuyugomori) is our kigo today. I think it needs no explanation, but I have found a nice haiku with this kigo by Matsuo Basho. He wrote this haiku at the age of 45.

Fuyugomori (Winter Seclusion)
In rural Japan, especially in the Northern areas along the coast of the Sea of Japan, the winter is long and brings enormous amounts of snow. There was nothing much to do that sit back and wait it out. The farmhouses where difficult to heat and the family huddled around the hearth (irori) in the kitchen. It was a tough time to live through with great endurance. This is what we call winter seclusion, really a tough time.

Here is the haiku I mentioned above:

sashikomoru mugura no tomo kabuna uri

winter seclusion
the only friend to rely on
grass stuffed mattres

© Basho (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

A nice classical haiku I think, my translation is a way of free-styling, because "sashikomoru" means actually "staying indoors", but in my opinion that's almost the same as "fuyugomori" (winter seclusion).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 20th at noon (CET). Tomorrow we will have another nice modern kigo taken from Jane's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku". For now ... have fun!


Friday, January 11, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #67 Troiku Hineri: Apple Blossoms


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday January 13th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new edition of our CDHK Weekend Meditation. Earlier I promised you to follow the Pan American Highway in our weekend meditations this month, but I have decided to leave the Pan American Highway and give you another challenge for this weekend.

We have done this more often here at CDHK so here is your task for this weekend meditation: I will give you four haiku to work with. You may decide which haiku you want to use to create a "fusion-ku" with. Of course the "crossroads-idea" is not the only thing you have to do. I love to challenge you to create a Troiku Hineri with your "fusion-ku". What is a "Troiku Hineri"? Well let me try to explain that:

Logo Troiku Hineri

As you all know a Troiku starts with a haiku and the following three haiku start with the separated lines of the first haiku. In a "Troiku Hineri" (a Troiku with a twist) I challenge you to do the same with the three haiku following the "starter-haiku" of the Troiku. So you have to create nine new haiku with the separated lines of your first three haiku of the "regular Troiku". All together ... you have to create TWELVE new haiku and ofcourse your "fusion-ku". It's a tough challenge I think ... so take your time, meditate and contemplate on what you are going to share with us.

Here are the four haiku to work with, all haiku by Jane Reichhold and taken from her online Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku", Spring section:

light carried in my arms
apple blossoms from a neighbor
on my doorstep

clusters talking
together in admiration
apple blossoms

sun transformed
into apple blossoms
the ground is level

the dam is broken
spring cascades into valleys
as apple blossoms

© Jane Reichhold (1937-2016)

Peacock, Apple Blossom by Bairei Kono (1899) (image found on Pinterest)
Well ... a nice, but difficult challenge for this weekend I think. But I am confident that you all can do it. Have a great weekend!

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 13th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 20th at noon (CET).


Thursday, January 10, 2019

Carpe Diem #1582 Black Birds (modern kigo)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at our wonderful Haiku Kai were we are exploring the beauty of all kinds of Japanese poetry especially haiku and tanka. This month we are exploring kigo, those nice words that point towards the season in which the haiku scene was seen. This month I have chosen kigo (classical and modern) for winter and today I have a wonderful modern kigo taken from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", a modern Saijiki.

Winter is associated with snow, virginity, cold weather and so on. The "white-ness" in contrast with for example the blackness of several kinds of birds. Maybe you remember this beauty by Basho:

a crow
has settled on a bare branch —
autumn evening

© Basho

Crow

Of course this isn't a real winter haiku, but it can be easily set into winter in my opinion. I have  given it a try:

winter moonlight
on a bare branch covered with snow
a crow's shadow


© Chèvrefeuille

Today our modern kigo is Black Birds, extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" and here are a few haiku written by Jane taken from her above mentioned Saijiki:

flying from the branch
sun in a bird's wing
a shower of snow

blackbirds leaving
on bare winter wands
pussy willows

winter birds
kicking down fireworks
from snowy twigs

© Jane Reichhold (1937-2016)

Black Birds

Well ... I hope I have inspired you all to create haiku with this modern kigo. Maybe you can try to create a tanka or maybe choose the classical way of haiku writing and use the classical rules. It's all up to you.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 17th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on. Have fun!


Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Carpe Diem #1581 Setsubun


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

This month we are exploring all kigo (seasonwords) for winter not only the classical kigo, but also the  modern kigo as gathered by Jane Reichhold in her Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku". Today I have a wonderful classical kigo for you to work with ... setsubun. This is a not so well known classical kigo and I think I have to give you a small explanation of this classical kigo.

Setsubun: The last day of winter. Features ritualistic chasing of devils out of the house, allowing good luck for the spring (the traditional New Year). Compare the English ritual of opening front and back doors.
Setsubun is an annual Japanese festival on February 3rd. Setsubun is the beginning of Spring according to the old Japanese lunar calendar. It's traditionally believed that the spirit world comes closer to our world at this time of year. Strips of paper with people's wishes inscribed on them are placed over the lanterns. It's thought that wishes may be granted on Setsubun, but they also think that, through the idea of having the spirit world closer by at this event, demons can escape to our world..

Daffodils ... sign of Setsubun

And here is an example of a haiku by myself themed "setsubun":

dispelling the darkness
after the long cold winter
welcoming the light

Or this one with another angle:

covered with snow
winter is coming to an end
Daffodils blooming

© Chèvrefeuille

Two nice haiku (how immodest) in which I have tried to catch "setsubun".

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 16th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!

PS.: I am far behind with commenting and I don't know if I can catch up, but of course I will try.


Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Carpe Diem #1580 moonlight (modern kigo, extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku")


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Haiku Kai, the place to be if you like to write and share Japanese poetry. This month we are exploring kigo (seasonwords) for winter. Those kigo can be classical or modern and today I have chosen for a modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", the online version.

Today I have chosen the modern kigo ... moonlight. Why is this a modern kigo for winter? Well in Japanese culture "moon" is a kigo for Autumn, but in our Western society "moon" is mostly a kigo for winter, but that is not our discussion here.

winter moonlight

Today I hope to inspire you with "moonlight" and a few haiku created by Jane Reichhold:

winter moonlight
the crystal prism turns
with the tides

surf and sea
white with the sound
of moonlight

© Jane Reichhold (extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku")

Two nice haiku to inspire you ....

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 15th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!


Monday, January 7, 2019

Carpe Diem #1579 bonfire (takibi)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

We are exploring the modern and classical kigo (seasonwords) for winter. Yesterday we had a nice modern kigo from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", the online version. Today I have a nice classical kigo for you to work with. Today our kigo is "bonfire (takibi)". In this time of year, the Holidays, I think there are several bonfires all around the world in this time of year. So no need to explain this kigo ...

To inspire you I have a wonderful "bonfire" video for you. In this video you can see a bonfire, but also hear a sweet children's song from Japan.


I hope you enjoyed this music video and that it has awakened your muse.

I found a nice haiku themed "bonfire" by Mamta Agarwal:

sit around bonfire, 
sparks rise and fly like glow worms; 
charred logs fall with thud. 

© Mamta Agarwal

And here a haiku written by myself:

bonfire
the scent of pine trees overwhelms the senses -
back to school again

© Chèvrefeuille

Bonfire (takibi)
To conclude this episode I have another nice "bonfire" haiku by Kobayashi Issa, one of the five greatest haiku poets:

foot of the mountain--
without a cheer
my New Year's bonfire

© Kobayashi Issa

Well ... I hope I have awakened your muses.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 14th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Sunday, January 6, 2019

Carpe Diem #1578 Amaryllis (modern kigo)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend full of inspiration and joy. I had a nice relaxed weekend and I enjoyed it a lot. Tomorrow (January 7th) I will start in a new position as a senior oncology nurse, a kind of manager, at a nursing home in my hometown. As I told you earlier I started in the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam, but travelling to the VU Medical Center took to much of my energy, so my health became worse. So I had to decide to resign from the job in VU Medical Center. I am glad that I have found another wonderful job ... I am excited to start there.

This month we will explore the seasonwords (kigo) for winter. A kigo is a word that indicates the season in which the haiku scene was seen. This month I will try to inspire you through modern and classical kigo for winter. Today I have chosen a nice modern kigo (taken from Jane Reichhold's "A  Dictionary of Haiku") ... Amaryllis.

Amaryllis
The Amaryllis is typical for this time of the year, Christmas and New Year. We see them often here in The Netherlands, but I think you all know this beautiful flower.

Here are a few haiku themed "Amaryllis" created by Jane Reichhold:

swollen
the amaryllis bud
already red

low-slanted sun
in the red amaryllis
turning on lights

© Jane Reichhold (taken from the online version of "A Dictionary of Haiku")

I found a nice "story" about the Amaryllis. I love to share that "story" here too, just for fun or to help your inspiration.

[...] "Legend has it that the amaryllis - the stunning red flower we've come to associate with the holidays - began as a shy, timid nymph. Amaryllis fell deeply in love with Alteo, a shepherd with Hercules' strength and Apollo's beauty, but her affections were unrequited. Hoping that she could win him over by bestowing upon him the thing he desired most - a flower so unique it had never existed in the world before - Amaryllis sought advice from the oracle of Delphi.

Following his instructions, Amaryllis dressed in maiden's white and appeared at Alteo's door for 30 nights, each time piercing her heart with a golden arrow. When at last Alteo opened his door, there before him was a striking crimson flower, sprung from the blood of Amaryllis's heart. With this romantic - albeit tragic - tale as its beginning, it's not surprising that today the amaryllis has come to symbolize pride, determination and radiant beauty." [...] (Source: Teleflora)

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 13th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Friday, January 4, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #66 On the road again ... Tacna (Peru)


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday January 6th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

As I promised you all the weekend meditations of January will be a "follow-up" of our Pan American Highway adventure last December 2018. This is the first weekend meditation of January and I have a nice challenge for you I think.

We have arrived at Tacna Peru, close to the Chile border, and as you maybe know Peru was once part of Spain and the main religion was Catholic church. For this weekend meditation I have a wonderful image for you of the "Catedral de Tacna" to inspire you. Next to that image I love to challenge you to create a haibun with a maximum of 250 words (including the poetry) in which you try to describe your "inner journey".

Here is the image to inspire you:

Catedral de Tacna
in the old cathedral
the scent of incense
I hear the prayers

deep silence
only whispered prayers -
the scent of incense

© Chèvrefeuille

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 6th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 13th at noon (CET). Have a wonderful weekend.

Thursday, January 3, 2019

Carpe Diem #1577 snowflakes (kazahana)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

This month we are exploring the kigo (seasonwords) of winter. Kigo are part of haiku since the birth of haiku, back into the 17th century. In that century several of the renown haiku poets lived their life. For example the greatest of them all Matsuo Basho, but there were several other haiku poets that created their haiku in that century.
One of the basic rules of a classical haiku is the use of kigo. A kigo is a word that points towards the season in which the haiku scene was created. This month that classical rule we are exploring through modern and classical kigo and today I have a nice classical kigo, snowflakes (kazahana). Snowflakes we know all. Those wonderful creations, so fragile and in very different kinds. The Japanese translation "kazahana" means literaly "wind flowers" and I think that's the right translation for snowflakes, because as we look at snowflakes they look like flowers.

Snowflake (kazahana)
Look at the fragile structure and beauty of the above snowflake ... gorgeous isn't it? Nature is full of this beauty, but when did we (humans) stop appreciating the beauty of nature? I don't know, because I love nature in all its wonders. As a haiku poet I am admiring nature ... it's so beautiful and we have to cherish it.

I found two beautiful haiku by Kobayashi Issa:

little straw mat--
the cat comes with a coat
of snowflakes

snowflakes flitting down--
a winter solstice
celebration

© Kobayashi Issa

Fragile beauty (kazahana - snowflakes)
And here are a few haiku from my archive:

snowflakes
cover the red roses
on a new grave

falling gently
snowflakes
fragile beauty

© Chèvrefeuille

Look at that beauty ... isn't it a wonderful piece of nature? Snowflakes ... are awesome!

After doing some extra research I found another nice haiku about snowflakes by my sensei Basho:

polished again
the mirror is as clear as
flower-like snowflakes

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

There is a small anecdote on this one. I remember that I once wrote a haiku in the same way, with almost the same words before I ever had heard of Basho or had read all his work. At that moment I was just a starting haiku poet and I was ofcourse proud on this one, but than ... it turned out to be a haiku by Basho. Here is that haiku I once wrote:

polished again
on the clear mirror
flowers of snow

© Chèvrefeuille

Isn't that strange? 

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 10th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our first weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Carpe Diem #1576 Dawn


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. This month we are going "classic" or in other words we are exploring classical and modern kigo (seasonwords). Today I have a wonderful modern kigo, again extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", for you. Today that modern kigo for winter is "dawn" and to give you an idea of this modern kigo I have a few example haiku by Jane herself:

winter dawn
sounds of blowing snow
sleeping birds

sea dawn
the journey of snowflakes
to a parking lot

clouds resting
on top of snowdrifts
winter dawn

© Jane Reichhold (extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku", the online version)

winter dawn
at dawn
fresh white blanket
ah! that silence


© Chèvrefeuille

I love the silence of a winter dawn as fresh fallen snow covers the fields.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 9th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!


Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Carpe Diem #1575 Fuyukasumi (Winter Mist)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful New Year's Eve and an awesome start of 2019. I had for sure a wonderful New Year's Eve ...
This month we are finding our inspiration through the kigo (seasonwords) of winter. Yesterday I started with a modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" and today I have a nice classical kigo for you: Fuyukasumi (or Winter Mist)

I found a nice example of a haiku themed "winter mist" by Chenou Liu:

winter mist
another bowl
of veggie soup

© Chenou Liu

Fuyukasumi (Winter Mist)
 Well ... we are on our way into a new year full of inspiration.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 8th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.