Friday, May 17, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #85 Photo-shopping Haiku (2) Cherry Blossom


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday May 19th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new CDHK Weekend Meditation. That special feature that gives you the opportunity to meditate and contemplate before you can submit your response. Before I give you the new "weekend meditation" task I have an announcement to make.

As you maybe remember ... last month I took a week off ... That gave me the opportunity to take a rest and have more time for those around me. I also told you last month that I will take a week off every month and next week is that week. This weekend meditation is the start of this week off and next Friday May 24th I will publish our new weekend meditation. So next week I will not publish our regular episodes. It gives you also time to take your time to respond without the pressure of a new episode every day.

Okay back to this weekend meditation. Several weeks ago I intoduced to you a new feature here at CDHK "Photo-Shopping Haiku". (description of this new feature HERE).


Cherry Blossom

For this weekend meditation "Photo-Shopping Haiku" I have chosen a beautiful haiku to "photo-shop" by Kobayashi Issa:

even an old man
has New Year's eyes...
cherry blossoms

© Kobayashi Issa (Tr. David G. Lanoue)

Give it a thought and try to 'photo-shop" it to a "better version of itself" just by "a little change". Have fun!

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday May 19th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 26th at noon (CEST). Have a wonderful weekend!


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1666 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (13) dangling prayer beads


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. Yesterday I gave you a hineri episode with gorgeous haiku crafted by Jane Reichhold. Today I have chosen a beauty by one of the Big Five Haiku Masters, Kobayashi Issa, to work with.

During lack of time I will give you only the haiku to work with:

prayer beads dangling
a harvest moon prayer...
mountain home

© Kobayashi Issa

Prayer Beads Dangling
This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 23rd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1665 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (12) "special" Basho "Miscanthus bud"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a "special" episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. Today I have a few nice haiku by Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) for you to work with. You may choose a haiku to work with of you can use them all. Why is this episode "special"? Well I realised today that this year Basho's birth and death are celebrated. He was born 325 years ago and died 375 years ago, so in my opinion this is "special".

I will give you a short overview of his life hereafter:

Matsuo Bashō (1644–1694), born, then Matsuo Chūemon Munefusa, was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in the collaborative haikai no renga form; today, after centuries of commentary, he is recognized as the greatest master of haiku (then called hokku). Matsuo Bashō's poetry is internationally renowned; and, in Japan, many of his poems are reproduced on monuments and traditional sites. Although Bashō is justifiably famous in the West for his hokku, he himself believed his best work lay in leading and participating in renku. He is quoted as saying, "Many of my followers can write hokku as well as I can. Where I show who I really am is in linking haikai verses."

Matsuo Basho (1644-1694)

Bashō was introduced to poetry at a young age, and after integrating himself into the intellectual scene of Edo (modern Tokyo) he quickly became well known throughout Japan. He made a living as a teacher; but then renounced the social, urban life of the literary circles and was inclined to wander throughout the country, heading west, east, and far into the northern wilderness to gain inspiration for his writing. His poems were influenced by his firsthand experience of the world around him, often encapsulating the feeling of a scene in a few simple elements. (Source: wikipedia)

Here are the haiku to work with:

the Dutchmen, too,
kneel before His Lordship --
spring under His reign.


by my new banana plant
the first sign of something I loathe --
a miscanthus bud!



Miscanthus

another year is gone
a traveler's shade on my head,
straw sandals at my feet


now then, let's go out
to enjoy the snow ... until
I slip and fall!


© Basho

Four very nicely crafted haiku by my master, Matsuo Basho. You may choose from these four to create Tan Renga with or you can use them all. That's up to you.

This "special" episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 22nd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1664 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (11) Tan Renga Hineri "Only Tracks"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Here is our delayed post as mentioned yesterday. Today I love to challenge you to create a Tan Renga Hineri. That means: I will give you a haiku to work with. You have to add a minimum of three stanza and a maximum of five stanza. You have to create the 2nd stanza, the 3rd stanza (a haiku) and a 4th stanza (two lined). If you are inspired enough than you can add also a fifth stanza (a haiku) and a 6th stanza (two lined). Try to create a "short story" and try to "close the chain" with a "ageku" (closing verse) that refers to the 1st (given) stanza.

Footsteps On The Beach (image found on pxhere)

Today I have a beautiful haiku by Jane Reichhold (1937-2016) to work with. Try to create your Tan Renga Hineri in honor of her.

late summer
alone on the beach
with only tracks

© Jane Reichhold

I think this haiku is a beauty to work with. It has so many scenes hidden in it ...

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 21st at noon (CEST). I will publish our new episode immediately hereafter.


Carpe Diem's new episode delayed


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Our new episode in our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 is delayed through lack of time. I will try to post it later this day. My excuses for this inconvenience.

Chèvrefeuille, your host

Monday, May 13, 2019

Carpe Diem #1663 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (10) snap of an icicle


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. This month I challenge you to create Tan Renga with a given haiku and today I have chosen a haiku by one of our long time members and gifted haiku poetess ... Kim M. Russell.

As you all know a while ago we started our Quest for a New Masterpiece and the haiku for today is a Masterpiece in my opinion. It's a haiku that can become an "evergreen".


Icicles (image found on pixabay)

Here is the haiku, this masterpiece, by Kim:

muffled and silenced
the snap of an icicle
engulfed by fresh snow

© Kim M. Russell (16th December 2018)

A wonderful haiku to start the Tan Renga with I would say, however I couldn't come up with a nice 2nd stanza. Maybe later I will publish my own Tan Renga ...

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 20th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!

PS. I have published a new task on tanka at Tanka Splendor. You can find Tanka Splendor through the link at the right side of our Kai. You are invited to participate.


Sunday, May 12, 2019

Carpe Diem #1662 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (9) Watching a Snail


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend, I had for sure a nice weekend. Welcome at a new episode in our TRC month May 2019. As you all know I see Basho (1644-1694) as my sensei, my master therefore I have chosen a haiku written by myself in honor of him, my master,

As I discovered haiku back in the late eighties I hadn't heard of Basho, but after reading one of the most popular haiku books in Dutch ("Een Jonge Maan", by J. van Tooren; "A young Moon" by J. van Tooren) I was caught by the beauty of the haiku written by Basho ... I read all haiku that are known by him and so I am ... influenced by Basho's way of writing haiku. I owe a lot of my haiku skills to him and of course to Jane Reichhold, who has given me the opportunity to read all the haiku by Basho in her "Basho, The Complete Haiku".

Snails in the Moonlight
And here is the haiku to work with. It's part of a cascading haiku I created back in February 2012:

I bow to my master
Matsuo Basho told me the way
to watch a snail

© Chèvrefeuille

Well ... a nice haiku I would say (how immodest) in honor of my master Matsuo Basho. And now it is up to you to add the 2nd satnza of this Tan Renga ... have fun!

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 19th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Saturday, May 11, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #84 Quest for a new masterpiece "Movement" (Unduo)


!! Open for your submissions tomorrow at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First I have to apologize that I am late with publishing this weekend meditation. Yesterday I had a very busy day at work, so I had no opportunity to create the weekend meditation for you. This weekend I love to challenge you again to create your NEW masterpiece.

A haiku masterpiece is a haiku that will last forever and will be renown to a lot of people. For example Basho's "frog pond" haiku is such a masterpiece. That haiku is even known by a lot of non haiku poets, because of it's beauty and spiritual layer, but also because he brought "movement" in this haiku. Before he created this "frog pond" haiku, the haiku about frogs were about their croaking. So "movement" was a new idea for haiku about frogs.


Apple Blossom (image found on Pinterest)

Let me give you an example of another haiku in which we see " movement":

apple blossom falls
scattered by the late spring breeze
apple blossom falls

© Chèvrefeuille

Your task for this weekend ... create a haiku, a new masterpiece, in which you use "movement" (or undou).

PS.: Undou is a new Haiku Writing Technique more about Undou? You can find HERE.

This episode is open for your submissions Sunday May 12th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 19th at noon (CEST). Have fun! Can you create a NEW masterpiece?


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Carpe Diem #1661 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (8) Beginning of Autumn


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. During lack of time I will give you only the haiku (by Jane Reichhold) to work with. So here is the haiku to work with:

cricket silence
between scraping sounds
autumn begins

© Jane Reichhold

And now it is up to you to create the second stanza of this Tan Renga.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 16th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Carpe Diem #1660 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (7) Wisteria


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019. Today I have chosen to challenge you with a haiku by Yosa Buson (1716-1784), one of the "Big Five" haiku poets. As Buson started creating haiku he used his own way of writing, because he wasn't a "fan" of Matsuo Basho (whom is seen as the "father of haiku"), but in his later life Buson went back to the way of Basho. He even illustrated the first published edition of Basho's "Narrow Road Into The Deep North" with his beautiful haiga-qualities.

Bird and Wisteria (Utagawa Hiroshige (1797 - 1858).
The above Japanese woodblock print shows you a nice composition of a bird and wisteria crafted by Utagawa Hiroshige. This woodblock print points you already the way to the haiku to use for your Tan Renga Challenge.

Here is the haiku by Buson to work with:

In the moonlight,
The color and scent of the wisteria
Seems far away.

© Yosa Buson

A fragile scene I can imagine it before my eyes. The soft light of the moon shines upon the wisteria. The wisteria's colors faint a little towards white and grey and with losing its color it also loses its scent... and the last line makes that scene very strong.

To create a Tan Renga with this haiku will not be an easy task, but I have given it a try:

In the moonlight,
The color and scent of the wisteria
Seems far away.                                                       © Buson

the sound of the thundering waves
makes the silence stronger
                                     © Chèvrefeuille

Not a strong second stanza in my opinion, but I like how with this 2nd stanza there is another sense present ... hearing and the realisation that through sound the silence can become deeper. It makes the scene even stronger ...

And now it is up to you. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 15th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Carpe Diem #1659 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (6) chestnut


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our TRC month May 2019 in which we are creating Tan Renga together with known and unknown haiku poets. Today I have a nice haiku written by Matsuo Basho for you to work with. There is a small story behind this haiku and I hope you can appreciate that I tell you the background of it.

As you maybe know, Basho was interested in man, he was homosexual common for his time homosexuality was accepted. Maybe you can remember that I told you about "Wakasu" (this was a common way of same-sex culture in the ancient Samourai class. It was a common use for adult man to have a relationship with minors. Of course in nowadays Japan this isn't an accepted habit as far as I know.) and as you maybe know Basho was a son of a low ranked samourai and maybe he was once a "wakasu" himself. There is however no reference towards that in the stories of his life.
Basho was once in love with the son of good friend of him. The boy was 14 years of age and had a warm relation with Basho.


Chestnut Tree in full bloom

In several of his haiku Basho is referring to his homosexuality. The haiku I have chosen to work with is such a haiku. I will not give you further explanation about this haiku ... I leave that to you.

Here is the haiku to work with:

autumn moonlight--
a worm digs silently
into the chestnut.

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

It's a wonderful haiku, even if you don't know the background on it this is a beauty. I have given it a try to create the 2nd stanza to this one. Here is my attempt:

autumn moonlight --
a worm digs silently
into the chestnut
                                             © Basho

at the crack of the day
birds start to praise their Creator 
             © Chèvrefeuille

I think this is a very nicely crafted continuation of the haiku by Basho. Maybe there is even a small reference to the background of the haiku by Basho.

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 14th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!

PS.: I try another linking widget (again). Click on the CDHK logo below to find the linking widget.


Monday, May 6, 2019

Carpe Diem #1658 Tan Renga Challenge Month May 2019 (5) Wintry gusts


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new TRC episode here at CDHK, the place to be if you like to write and share Japanese poetry. This month we are creating Tan Renga with eachother. Tan Renga looks similar with Tanka, but instead of being written by one poet it's written by two poets.

A Tan Renga has two stanza. The first stanza is 3-lined ("hokku") and the second stanza is 2-lined ("ageku"). To create the second stanza you have to associate on images and scenes in the first stanza. Together the both stanza are called Tan Renga or Short Chained Verse.

Today I have a nice haiku for you to work with. The haiku for today is written by a not so renown haiku poet, Akutagawa Ryunosuke (1892-1927). Let me tell you first a little bit about him and after that I will give you the haiku to work with.

Akutagawa Ryunosuke (1892-1927)
Akutagawa Ryunosuke

A Japanese writer active in Taisho period Japan. He is regarded as the "Father of the Japanese short story", and is noted for his superb style and finely detailed stories that explore the darker side of human nature.
... Akutagawa published his first short story Rashōmon the following year in the literary magazine Teikoku Bungaku ("Imperial Literature"), while still a student. The story, based on a fantasy from late Heian period Japan, with a sharp twist of psychological drama, was largely unnoticed by the literary world, except by noted author Natsume Sōseki.
It was also at this time that he started writing haiku under the haigo (or pen-name) Gaki, Hungry Ghost. (Source)

Sardines

Here is the haiku to work with:

kogarashi ya mezashi ni nokoru umi-no iro

Wintry gusts:
on the sardine still lingers
the ocean's color.

© Akutagawa Ryunosuke a.k.a. Gaki (Tr.: Ueda)

A wonderful haiku as I may say so. I however couldn't come up with a good 2nd stanza to complete the Tan Renga, but maybe you are more inspired.

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 13th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new TRC later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, May 5, 2019

Carpe Diem #1657 Tan Renga Challenge May 2019 (4) Ocean Sanctuary


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge (TRC) Month May 2019. This month it's all about short chained verses also known as Tan Renga. A Tan Renga looks very similar with Tanka, but instead of being written by one poet, the Tan Renga is written by two poets.

The goal of TRC is to complete or continue a given haiku (3-lined verse) by adding a 2-lined stanza through association on the scenes / images in the given haiku. Today I have chosen a haiku by Jane Reichhold to create a Tan Renga with.
As you all know Jane Reichhold died in 2016 after a period of extreme pain and discomfort. She was one of the most famous modern haiku poets the world ever has known. And she was a co-host here at our own Haiku Kai.

Waves Kneeling On The Beach

sunday morning 
all the waves in white
kneeling on the beach

© Jane Reichhold (Taken from "Ocean Sanctuary" an anthology of haiku inspired on the North Coast of California)

"Ocean Sanctuary" was never published and that's a sad idea, because Jane had gathered a lot of wonderful haiku fitting this theme. Really worth to read them ...

Here is my Tan Renga that I created from this beautiful haiku by Jane. She is still missed.

sunday morning
all the waves in white
kneeling on the beach  
                                  © Jane Reichhold

without loosing their virginity
monks bow in front of Mother
 Mary            © Chèvrefeuille

A little bit of humor maybe, but also spirituality, because monks choose to be virgin always. They give their lives to their God and live their lives in chastity.

I hope you did like this continuation and I hope that you don't see this as sacrilege. The scene of the bowing monks was the first thing that came in mind as I read this haiku by Jane Reichhold.

This TRC is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 12th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new TRC later on. For now ... be inspired and have fun!


Friday, May 3, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #83 Renga With ... sun's reflection


!! Open for your submissions May 5th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new weekend meditation, that special feature for the weekends. A way of meditating and contemplating about a given theme or to reflect on your thoughts about haiku to work with. This weekend I have chosen to challenge you with a Renga With ... episode. This Renga With ... episode I love to challenge you to create a Renga with six haiku crafted by myself.

Here are the haiku to work with. I am looking forward to the renga toare going to create.

Narcissus
in love with his reflection
vainglorious guy

snowdrops blooming
waving goodbye to Winter
nearly Spring

icicles hanging
at the gutter of the old mansion
sun's reflections

Icicles (photo © Gita Photos _ Ron Hallam)

this cold winter night
laying naked under my quilt
feels like summer

messenger of heaven
circling high above my head -
re-thinking my life

light of ember
mysterious shadows on the wall -
a cool summer night

© Chèvrefeuille

You all know what to do but I will give you the task again. You have to add the two-lined stanza between the haiku. You may choose your own "line-up". Try to make it a closed chain by creating the "closing verse" or "ageku" associated on the "hokku" or "starting verse". Have a great weekend.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday May 5th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 12th at noon (CEST). 


Thursday, May 2, 2019

Carpe Diem #1656 Tan Renga Challenge May 2019 (3) Dandelion and Butterfly


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a joy to create this month full of TRC's created from modern and classical haiku. Today I have a nice classical, not so renown, haiku by one of the most famous female haiku poets, Chiyo-Ni.
As I discovered haiku back in the late eighties I only read haiku created by male poets, but at the start of this century I discovered that there were also female haiku poets. Chiyo-Ni was one of the first haiku poetesses I discovered I was immediately in love with the beauty of her haiku especially that gorgeous one themed "morning glories", that renown one.

I think I have read the most of her haiku, but the haiku to work with today I wasn't familiar with so I am looking forward to your responses on this haiku.


Butterfly on Dandelion

Here is the first stanza of today's TRC, a haiku by Chiyo-Ni:

a dandelion
now and then interrupting
the butterflys dream

© Chiyo-Ni

Well ... it's now up to you to create a Tan Renga with this one. Have fun!

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 9th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on.


Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Carpe Diem #1655 Tan Renga Challenge (2) Beautiful Ugliness


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the 2nd episode of May 2019. This month we are creating short chained verses or Tan Renga. Tan Renga looks a lot like tanka, but instead of written by one haiku poet it is written by two haiku poets and therefore it's the smallest form of a chained verse.

For today's Tan Renga Challenge I have chosen a haiku by a not so well known haiku poet and contemporary of Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), Yozakura better known here at CDHK as the Unknown Haiku Poet.

Basho Tree or Banana Tree
In the Spring of 1681 a disciple of Basho, called Rika, presented him a banana tree (a Basho). From that moment on he changed his name to Basho and his home was called 'Basho-an' (the banana tree cottage).

As Basho he became a famous haiku master. His earlier haiku, which he wrote under several pseudonyms, are now also known as haiku written by Basho. The first haiku he wrote as Basho was the following one (according to Jane Reichhold):

basho ue te    mazu nikumu ogi no    futaba kana

planting a banana tree
more than ever I hate
sprouting reeds

© Matsuo Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

The above haiku isn't the haiku to work with by the way. It's another beautiful haiku created by Yozakura, the Unknown Haiku Poet:

banana-tree
unworthy to look at
beautiful ugliness

© Yozakura

Thistle in Full Bloom

And here is my attempt to create a Tan Renga with this beauty by Yozakura:

banana-tree
unworthy to look at
beautiful ugliness                                         © Yozakura

thistles in full bloom
dewdrops shimmer at dawn
                       © Chèvrefeuille

or this 2nd stanza:

dewdrops on thistles in full bloom
making them stunning at dawn
                  © Chèvrefeuille

I couldn't decide which 2nd stanza to use. I prefer the second, but I don't know it for sure. What's your idea? Share it with me through the comment-field.

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 8th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new Tan Renga Challenge later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem Extra May 1st 2019 Tanka Splendor re-opened


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I have re-opened our Tanka Splendor weblog on WP. It's the place for you if you like to create Tanka and share it with the world. Tanka Splendor will be published every Wednesday. I will give you a theme or a tanka to work with  Feel free to visit and participate in Tanka Splendor.

This week I have chosen for a beautiful tanka by Jane Reichhold to inspire you. You can find Tanka Splendor by clicking on the image at the right side of our Kai.

Namasté,

Chèvrefeuille, your host

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Carpe Diem #1654 Tan Renga Challenge (1) Smoldering Fireplace



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Haiku Kai. This is the first episode of May 2019. This month it's Tan Renga Challenge Month again. So this month all the prompts are haiku by modern and classical haiku poets to create Tan Renga with.

Tan Renga looks like a tanka, but instead of being written by one poet the Tan Renga is written by two poets. Tan Renga is a short chained verse of two stanza. The first stanza has three lines and the second stanza has two lines. More about Tan Renga you can find above in the menu, but I think that you all know how Tan Renga is created.

For this first Tan Renga Challenge of May 2019 I have chosen a haiku that I recently created. It's up to you to create the second stanza (approx. 7-7 syllables) through associating on the scene(s) in the given haiku.

Smoldering Fireplace

Here is the haiku to work with:

smouldering fireplace
the sweet perfume of burned herbs
loneliness grabs my throat

© Chèvrefeuille

Well ... I think this one is great to work with, but it will not be an easy task ... have fun!

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 7th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new Tan Renga Challenge later on.


Monday, April 29, 2019

Carpe Diem #1653 passing spring (yuku haru)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the last episode of this month in which we explored the beauty of modern and classical kigo for spring and because of the fact that this is the last episode I have chosen for a classical kigo that fits this last episode ... passing spring (yuku haru).

At the end of spring we are longing for summer, spring has passed by and has spread new life all around us. Nature is in full bloom and the bare branches are covered with blossoms and young green leaves. The meadows are sprinkled with the most beautiful flowers on earth ... isn't it exiting? Finally we can say ... the light has returned to us and now we may celebrate summer.

Spring passes
and the birds cry out—tears
in the eyes of fishes

© Matsuo Bashō (Tr Sam Hamill, taken from "Narrow Road Into The Deep Interior")

The above haiku is an example of this classical kigo, passing spring (yuku haru), isn't it a beauty?




lying on the beach
dreaming away in a midday nap
departing spring

© Chèvrefeuille

I couldn't come up with a new haiku, so I shared a beauty from my archive. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 6th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new (first) episode of May later on. Next month all the prompts will be Tan Renga Challenges. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, April 28, 2019

Carpe Diem #1652 Cherry Petals (modern kigo)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the penultimate episode of April 2019. This month I took a week off and I enjoyed it. This month we have explored modern and classical kigo for spring and today I love to challenge you with a modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's modern saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku".
Today I saw the cherry petals fall from the Sakura in my backyard and that brought me the idea to give you a modern kigo related to that event ... cherry petals.




And here is an example (or two) extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" with this modern kigo:

a long journey
some cherry petals
begin to fall

garden waterfall
cherry petals float to earth
in the sound

© Jane Reichhold (taken from: "A Dictionary of Haiku".)

Two beauties I think. Both give tribute to Jane, because she was one of the best modern haiku poets I have ever known. She was renown all over the globe and was once my co-host here at CDHK. She is still missed dearly, but I know her spirit is dwelling here at our wonderful Haiku Kai.

spring breeze
rustles through the cherry trees
it seems to be snowing

© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until May 5th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our last episode of April later on. Next month it's Tan Renga Challenge month and I hope you all will join in again to create this wonderful small chained verses.


Friday, April 26, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #82 Introducing a new feature ... "photo-shopping haiku"


!! open for your submissions next Sunday April 28th at 7:00 PM (CEST)  !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Introducing a new feature. "A new feature again?" I can hear you almost say or think that, but I think it's time for something new as you also will see soon in the lay-out of our wonderful Haiku Kai. I have chosen a more modern look and I hope you all will like it.
Why this upcoming change? Well ... I took a week off for the very first time at CDHK, but that doesn't mean I wasn't busy with CDHK, however ... I did like this week off and I will do that every month from now on. Maybe you think "The end of CDHK is near", but that's not what this means. It gives me the opportunity to improve CDHK. CDHK was once, according to Jane Reichhold, the best website on haiku around the globe, and that's my dear CDHK-family members, my goal ... to stay "on top of the world" so to say.



As you all know I see, Matsuo Basho, as my master and I just hope that I am worthy to be his apprentice.

Basho once said: "I tried to give up the way of fuga (poetry) and stop writing verses. But each time I did so, a poetic sentiment would tug at my heart and something would flicker in my mind. Such is, the magic spell of the life of poetry".

And that's my feeling right now. I am on a, say ..., crossroad but cannot decide which road I will take.
My dilemma is: "Do I go on with my poetry or do I leave the road of poetry. Do I go on with CDHK or will I stop and close the website. It's really a dilemma, because I love what I am creating with CDHK, but it takes a lot of my time. Creating CDHK takes from my personal time to create haiku. Back in the late eighties I discovered the beauty of haiku ... I was immediately caught by this beautiful small poem. During the years my haiku writing skills evolved to a certain quality and (how immodest) my haiku arose to the quality of Basho, but since I started CDHK it feels that I just create haiku commercially and that's for sure not how I saw haiku back in the late eighties.
Ofcourse sometimes I create haiku with quality like those by Basho, but it doesn't give me the pleasure anymore that I felt. This makes me sad, this is why I chose to take a week off. This week brought me a lot of insight. It gave me the insight that creating CDHK is my passion and I can't live without it. So I am back on track ... or like Basho I am under the magic spell of the life of poetry.



Back to the "root" of this episode "introducing a new feature".

A new feature at CDHK not easy to create, but I have found a new idea and I am trying to make it fit for our new modernised (soon the kay-out will change) CDHK.
Not so long ago I saw an episode of the TV-show "America's Next Top Model". In that episode the producers showed the public how photos are retouched to make the model look more beautiful and attractive. Something like "photo-shopping" I think or revising.
Photo-shopping sounds awfull but, I think it's possible to "photo-shop" haiku and tanka too. Just a little change can make the difference between a good haiku (or tanka) and an excellent haiku (or tanka).
I love to make photos, but I am not a photographer that likes color. I am more of the black and white and sepia photos, because in my opinion the photos are more beautiful ... more vintage.




Maybe it's because of my age (56 yrs) or of my melancholic mind I don't know, but I do know that we can re-make "photo-shop" a haiku (or tanka) into a vintage one just by retouching of a small part. So this new feature, that I first titled "vintage haiku", I have "re-titled" into "photo-shopping haiku".

Let me give you an example:

autumn has come
visiting my ear on
a pillow of wind


© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

As I start "photo-shopping" this haiku by my master, Matsuo Basho, than I think 'I can bring more softness, tranquility, into it by changing a small part of this haiku into:

whispering into my ear
on a pillow of wind


In this example I only let the first line un-touched:

autumn has come
whispering into my ear
on a pillow of wind


© Chèvrefeuille

I think this "small" re-touch makes this haiku more soft, lovely and tranquil. What do you think?

The first challenge for this new feature "Photo-shopping Haiku" is: "Photo-shop" the above haiku by Basho. Good Luck!

This weekend-meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday April 28th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until May 5th at noon (CEST). Have a great weekend!


Friday, April 19, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #81 Poetry Archive (5) ... loneliness or emptiness


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday April 21st at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

It's weekend again ... so time for a new weekend meditation, our special CDHK feature for the weekend to meditate and contemplate about a theme. This weekend I have chosen for a new episode of our Poetry Archive feature. This feature is about your archive. Choose a haiku, tanka or other form of Japanese poetry from your archive and share it with us all. Tell us why you have chosen for that poem from your archive and create a new poem inspired on your choice. This time I have another wonderful theme ... loneliness or emptiness ...

In an earlier post this month I told you all that I needed a week off. That week is now upcoming. I will not post new episodes this week, but of course I will give you a new weekend meditation at the end of this "free off-week". It gives me time to relax and it will give you the chance to relax too and inhale new energy.




Okay ... back to our weekend meditation ... Poetry Archive ... Loneliness or Emptiness ...

Here is a haiku from my archive(s) themed "loneliness" and one themed "emptiness":

in front of the fireplace
an empty bottle and broken wine glasses 
after the quarrel

an empty bowl
but in it is the spirit of emptiness -
the spring breeze

© Chèvrefeuille

Both haiku were responses on earlier posts here at CDHK. I like them both, but that second one I see as one of my masterpieces. It's a deep religious, spiritual, experience ... inspired on a "koan".


Loneliness

And here is a new one created from both of the haiku above, say a "fusion-ku":

smoldering fireplace
the sweet perfume of burned herbs
loneliness grabs my throat


© Chèvrefeuille

Have a wonderful weekend and a great week.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday April 21st at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until April 28th at noon (CEST). Have an awesome weekend!


Thursday, April 18, 2019

Carpe Diem #1651 dropwart (seri), Japanese parsley


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a wonderful spring day we have had here in The Netherlands. Whole day sunshine a really nice temperature ... it felt almost like a early summer day. Yes it was a gorgeous day. And I hope you all have had such a wonderful day too.

This month it's all about classical and non-classical kigo (seasonwords) for spring and today I have another nice classical kigo taken from the Shiki saijiki, dropwart (seri) or Japanese parsley.

Dropwart (Seri) (Japanese Parsley)
Dropwart is part a broad range of herbs, there are a lot of species of this parsley family. It's a spring kigo that is (was) used all spring, because it grows and blooms in all spring.

I have found a nice example for this classical kigo, a haiku by Yosa Buson (one of the "big five" haiku poets):

furudera ya houroku suteru seri no naka

By an old temple
a broken clay kitchen pot
in a field of water parsley


© Yosa Buson

And here is another "parsley"-haiku:

This is all there is;
the path comes to an end
among the parsley.


© Alan Watts

Two wonderful haiku I think as an example for this classical kigo for spring.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until April 25th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on.