Thursday, September 20, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (15) broken by the storm


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our Tan Renga Challenge Month September 2018. Today I have another beautiful haiku written by the queen of haiku and tanka, Jane Reichhold. I have taken this haiku from the "autumn" section, subsection "plants", of her online version of "A Dictionary of Haiku", a modern saijiki.

As you all know Jane played an important role here at CDHK and she is still missed by us all I think. Her spirit will be always dwelling here at our Kai.

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England aster) flower heads. Photo by Blanca Begert.

Here is the haiku (hokku) to work with:

broken by the storm
the asters' fragrance rises
out of damp earth

© Jane Reichhold

And now it is up to you to add your second stanza to make this Tan Renga complete and maybe you can try to honor Jane in your second stanza.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 27th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on. For now ... have fun!


Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (14) sparkling wine



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge month. During lack of time I have a short episode for you today. I will give you only the haiku ("hokku") to work with. This time I have chosen a haiku by the Unknown Haiku Poet Yozakura:

Sparkling wine
Flames dance in her hand
He is granted a smile


© Yozakura

sparkling wine

Now it's up to you ... add your second stanza and make this Tan Renga complete.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 26th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our next episode later on. For now .... be inspired and have fun!


Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (13) Withered Pampas Leaves


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month 2018. Today I have a very special haiku for you. It was written by Takarai Kikaku, and apprentice of Matsuo Basho. Kikaku wrote an account about Basho's last days. Kikaku was also known as Shinshi and he wrote a tribute haiku for his master and placed it on his memorial stone at the Gichuji Temple in Awazu.

A hat to cover
The body of our master,
Withered pampas leaves.

© Shinshi (haigo of Takarai Kikaku)


Basho's Memorial Stone at the Gichuji Temple in Awazu

By the way you can find the above mentioned Account on the last days of Basho at Simply Haiku, an online haiku magazine. It's a real nice piece of prose (and haiku) written by Kikaku.

Add your 2nd stanza of two lines of approximately 14 syllables and make the Tan Renga complete.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 25th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Monday, September 17, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (12) clouds and waves


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. And what a wonderful month this already is through all your wonderful completions / continuations of the Tan Renga this month. I have another beauty for you. This time I hope you will complete this Tan Renga starting with a nice haiku by Dolores of Ada's Poetry Alcove inspired on a poem by Rabindranath Tagore that we had in one of our recent  weekend meditations.

anchor (image found on pixabay)

Here is the haiku ("hokku") to work with and complete into a Tan Renga by adding your 2nd two-lined stanza:

clouds and waves
carry my dreams away
tugging my anchor

© Dolores

I have given it a try (of course), so here is my Tan Renga:

after a restless night I awake
in the arms of my muse


© Chèvrefeuille

Not as strong as I had hoped, but I like the twist in this 2nd stanza. And now it's up to you. Have fun!

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until 24th at noon (CEST). I hope to publish our new episode later on.


Sunday, September 16, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (11) the dim glow of a campfire


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

After an easy going weekend I have a new TRC for you. Today I have chosen another episode of our Hineri feature. So today I will give you the 2nd stanza of approximately 14 syllables spread over two lines. This time I don't have chosen a quote by a haiku poet, but by a young Japanese novelist.

First I will give you the quote to work with and than some background on this young Japanese novelist and I will end this episode with the two lined stanza I created inspired on the quote.

[...] "He felt so lost, he said later, that the familiar studio felt like a haunted valley deep in the mountains, with the smell of rotting leaves, the spray of a waterfall, the sour fumes of fruit stashed away by a monkey; even the dim glow of the master's oil lamp on its tripod looked to him like misty moonlight in the hills."[...]

© Akutagawa Ryūnosuke

Akutagawa Ryunosuke (1892-1927)

Akutagawa Ryūnosuke, pseudonym Chōkōdō Shujin or Gaki, (born March 1, 1892, Tokyo, Japan—died July 24, 1927, Tokyo), prolific Japanese writer known especially for his stories based on events in the Japanese past and for his stylistic virtuosity.
As a boy Akutagawa was sickly and hypersensitive, but he excelled at school and was a voracious reader. He began his literary career while attending Tokyo Imperial University (now the University of Tokyo), where he studied English literature from 1913 to 1916.
The publication in 1915 of his short story “Rashōmon” led to his introduction to Natsume Sōseki, the outstanding Japanese novelist of the day. With Sōseki’s encouragement he began to write a series of stories derived largely from 12th- and 13th-century collections of Japanese tales but retold in the light of modern psychology and in a highly individual style. He ranged wide in his choice of material, drawing inspiration from such disparate sources as China, Japan’s 16th-century Christian community in Nagasaki, and European contacts with 19th-century Japan. Many of his stories have a feverish intensity that is well-suited to their often macabre themes.
In 1922 he turned toward autobiographical fiction, but Akutagawa’s stories of modern life lack the exotic and sometimes lurid glow of the older tales, perhaps accounting for their comparative unpopularity. His last important work, “Kappa” (1927), although a satiric fable about elflike creatures (kappa), is written in the mirthless vein of his last period and reflects his depressed state at the time. His suicide came as a shock to the literary world.
Akutagawa is one of the most widely translated of all Japanese writers, and a number of his stories have been made into films. The film classic Rashomon (1950), directed by Kurosawa Akira, is based on a combination of Akutagawa’s story by that title and another story of his, “Yabu no naka” (1921; “In a Grove”).

Rashomon (movie by Akira Kurosawa)

I wrote the two lined stanza to work with inspired on the above quote of Akutagawa Ryūnosuke (1892-1927)

Haunted valley deep in the mountains
The dim glow of a campfire

© Chèvrefeuille

I think this 2nd stanza will inspire you to create the first stanza of the Tan Renga. Have fun!

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 23rd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our next episode later on today.


Saturday, September 15, 2018

Carpe Diem's Brainteaser #1 Introduction and first challenge

Credits logo




Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I had some spare time so I thought "let me create an all new feature" and I did. I have created a new feature to challenge you. I have titled this new feature "Carpe Diem's Brainteaser" and I think you will understand the goal already, but let me introduce this feature to you.

Back in 1988 I discovered haiku. At first I thought this is not my “cup of tea” “to difficult”, I thought, because I love long poems and short stories and in my opinion I need a lot of words to say what I want to say. So at first I wasn’t caught by haiku, but after reading a wonderful book about haiku I tried it. I remember that like it was yesterday. I even can remember my first haiku ever:

Honeysuckle blooms
sharing her sweet perfume
I dream away


©️ Chèvrefeuille

Not a strong one I think, but it was the first ever. And because of that I took Chèvrefeuille as my haigo (pseudonym). Chèvrefeuille means Honeysuckle.

As I started writing haiku I struggled a lot with the form. Haiku isn’t easy to create, because of its very short form and its rules. So haiku isn’t easy … haiku can be a brainteaser.

In this new feature I love to explore other “special” haiku forms like “Pi-ku” and for example the “Acrostic haiku”.

For this first episode of “Carpe Diem’s Brainteaser” I love to challenge you to create an “acrostic” haiku. What does that mean “acrostic”? Well an “acrostic” haiku looks like this:

Sweet memories
Under the old apple tree
Newly weds

©️ Chèvrefeuille
You take a word (in the above example “sun”) and with the separated letters from that word you have to create a haiku. Here is another example, this time the word is “one”:

Only eyes for you
Naked she lays down on the beach
Everlasting love

©️ Chèvrefeuille


To make it a little bit more challenging I have another “brainteaser” for you.
Another acrostic form uses an Acrostichon and a Liaison. In this one the Acrostichon is AUTUMN and the liaison is TUTU. More about this form you can find HERE.


A rainy day
Under the umbrella
Tears of joy
U
T
United again
Music of the Swanlake
Newly weds

©️ Chèvrefeuille

Here is another example of the above kind of haiku, in this one the acrostichon is "POETRY" and the liaison "EAST". In this one I have brought two worlds together:

Perfect way
Of writing haiku
Eastern thoughts
A
S

T
ulip bulbs
Redder than red
Year by year


© Chèvrefeuille

Enjoy this new feature. I created it just for the fun, but it will not be easy.

This episode of "brainteaser" is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 22nd at noon (CEST). Have fun!


Friday, September 14, 2018

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #50 Rabindranath Tagore's "where shadow chases light"



!! Open for your submissions next Sunday September 16th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

For this weekend meditation I have chosen another wonderful poem by Tagore to work with, but this time I love to challenge you a little bit more.

At the start of this month I told you that every weekend meditation would be a "Carpe Diem Distillation" episode, in that special feature the goal is to create a haiku (this time only haiku) from a given so called "long poem". This weekend I have "sympathy" as the poem to work with, also a beautiful poem by Tagore.

There is one difference with the other two weekend meditations we have had this month. This time you have to create a Troiku with your distilled haiku. More about Troiku you can find above in the menu. It's a creative way of haiku-ing invented by your host.

Surreal Landscape With Giant Buddha (image found on Shutterstock)
And now to our new poem by Tagore,


This is my delight,
thus to wait and watch at the wayside
where shadow chases light
and the rain comes in the wake of the summer.

Messengers, with tidings from unknown skies,
greet me and speed along the road.
My heart is glad within,
and the breath of the passing breeze is sweet.

From dawn till dusk I sit here before my door,
and I know that of a sudden
the happy moment will arrive when I shall see.

In the meanwhile I smile and I sing all alone.
In the meanwhile the air is filling with the perfume of promise.

©️ Rabindranath Tagore

Well ... try to create a haiku (only haiku this time) from this poem by Tagore and than create a Troiku with your "distilled" haiku.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday September 16th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until September 23rd at noon (CEST). Have a great weekend!


Carpe Diem Extra September 14th 2018: Last Call For Submissions Troiku Kukai 2nd edition



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,


Our 2nd edition of the Troiku Kukai is almost over you can submit your Troiku created from the following haiku by Yosa Buson until September 15th 10:00 PM (CEST).


Springtime rain -- 
little shell on a small beach, 
enough to moisten it


© Yosa Buson (Tr. unknown)


Email your Troiku to our email-address: carpediemhaikukai@gmail.com Please write Troiku Kukai 2 in the subject line.


!!! Last call for submissions !!!



Thursday, September 13, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (10) locusts fly low


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai were we are exploring Japanese poetry and this month ... Tan Renga. By the way my apologies for being late with publishing.

Today I have chosen a haiku written by Masaoka Shiki, the haiku poet who gave haiku its name and who brought haiku into the modern time. Shiki died in 1902 on the age of 34. I think he was and old soul in a young body. His haiku are really gorgeous and during his life you almost can read the changes in society in his haiku. Maybe you can remember his haiku about the steam engine, but that's not the haiku to work with.

Locusts flying low

Here is the haiku to create the Tan Renga with:

locusts fly low
over rice paddies
in the dim sunlight

© Masaoka Shiki

A real challenge I think. I have given it a thought, but couldn't come up with a 2nd stanza, maybe you can do it ...

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 20th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on. For now ... be inspired and above all .... heve fun!


Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together (III) (9) between dusty cars


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai were we are having our 3rd edition of our special feature TRC, or Tan Renga Challenge. This month I challenge you to create Tan Renga, a kind of chained verse written by two haiku poets, from a given haiku (or "hokku").

Today I have a nice haiku for you to work with. It's a haiku written by Kim M. Russell in response on one of our Quest For A New Masterpiece as featured in a Weekend Meditation in August 2018. I commented on this haiku:

[...] "Nice juxtaposition in this one; and also a kind fragment and phrase. Very well done … Your haiku paints a wonderful scene with the beauty of the classics like Onitsura and Basho. This is a haiku that will survive time … a masterpiece."[...]



And I think you all will think (or say) the same. Here is the haiku by Kim to work with:

between dusty cars
an orange butterfly flits
the traffic rumbles

Kim M. Russell, 26th August 2018

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until September 19th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Carpe Diem's Quest For A (New) Masterpiece #3 the quest continues


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Here at CDHK we are always active with creating haiku and tanka. And we all are hoping for that beauty that will be everlasting ... our masterpiece.
Today I love to continue our quest for a (new) masterpiece. This is the third episode in this quest here at CDHK. I hope you all will participate again and if it's okay by you all I will create a new exclusive CDHK E-book of all your (new) masterpieces after the fourth episode. That fourth episode I will publish next week on Wednesday.

What is a masterpiece? Let me re-produce that from the first episode of this new feature:

What makes a haiku (or tanka) a masterpiece? Well ... I will give it a try to tell you what a haiku (or tanka) makes a masterpiece in my opinion.
First: It has to describe a moment that got your attention.
Second: You have to use the right words. Words that describe the moment in its true way.
Third: Maybe ... use the classical way of creating haiku (or tanka) (as mentioned in CDHK Lecture One above in the menu).
Fourth: It has been written right from the heart or soul not the mind.
Fifth: It's (maybe) in the sense and tone of the classical haiku (tanka) poets.
Sixth: It has to be ... how shall I say it ... be your child, your creation ... in a masterpiece we can read, between the lines, the poet who created it.

Pine Tree (woodblock by Imoto Tekiho)

Let me give you an example of such a masterpiece by one of the classical haiku poets, Uejima Onitsura:

Uejima Onitsura was a Japanese haiku poet of the Edo period, famous in the Osaka region for his haiku poetry. Belonging to the Danrin school of Japanese poetry, Uejima is credited of helping to define and exemplify Bashō's style of poetry.

He has written several "masterpieces", I love his haiku that I use as an example:

a cooling breeze — 
and the whole sky is filled 
with pine-tree voices

© Onitsura (1660-1738)

And now it's up to you, my dear Haijin, to create your masterpiece, a haiku or tanka, and share it with us all. Don't be shy ... we are a loving family of haiku poets, so feel free to share your (new) masterpiece.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 19th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our fourth "quest for a (new) masterpiece" on that same day around 7:00 PM (CEST).


Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (8) pear tree in bloom


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our TRC month September 2018. A few days ago I challenged you to create the first stanza (hokku) of the Tan Renga inspired on the 2nd stanza given by me. I have another Hineri TRC for you today. This time I have chosen a quote by Masaoka Shiki and reworked it to a 2nd stanza. The goal is to create the first stanza of this Tan Renga.

Here is the re-worked quote by Shiki. I have turned it into the 2nd stanza to work with:

pear tree in full bloom on a battlefield
collapsed house becomes beautiful again


© Shiki (re-worked by Chèvrefeuille)

Pear Tree In Bloom (woodblock print by Kono Bairei)
A nice 2nd stanza to work with I would say. Now it is up to you to create the first stanza (hokku) of this Tan Renga.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 18th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. Have fun!


Renga With Basho Hineri #8 missing a wife


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of Renga With Basho. This time I have another Renga With Basho Hineri (with a twist) for you. Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) one of the most famous classical haiku poets has written a lot of haiku during his lifetime (around 1000 haiku). All wonderful but there is one haiku written by him that isn't finished, the third line is missing. If that haiku wasn't really finshed or that third line has been lost we don't know, but that unfinished haiku gives us the opportunity to be creative. How creative? Well ... we have the opportunity to create the third line of the haiku that was started by the master himself. That opportunity I will give you in this Renga With Basho Hineri episode.

I will give you six (6) haiku written by Basho, one of them is that unfinished haiku. The goal is to create a renga by adding your two-lined stanza (approximately 14 syllables) as we have done earlier, but you have to complete that unfinished haiku too. Of course you have the opportunity to choose your own line-up of the haiku.

Chinquapin Tree ("fake" chestnut)
Here are the six (6) haiku (including that unfinished one) to create your renga with Basho with:

missing a wife
putting on bamboo grass
--------------------


above all else
a dependable chinquapin tree stands
in a summer grove


path of the sun
the hollyhock leans into
early summer rain


each with its own light
fireflies in the trees
lodge in flowers


Dragonfly (image credits: National Trust For Scotland)

a dragonfly
unable to settle
on the grass


an early winter shower
a rice paddy with new stubble
darkens just a bit


© Matsuo Basho (taken from Basho, The Complete Haiku by Jane Reichhold)

A nice series of haiku to work with I think. I am looking forward to how your Renga With Basho will evolve. !! Don't forget to make that unfinsihed haiku complete, before you use it in your renga with Basho !!

To give you an idea how to complete that unfinished haiku here is my attempt to make it complete:

missing a wife
the bamboo grass dives under -
wise men's gathering (*)

© Chèvrefeuille

(*) refers to the "The Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove", a group of Chinese scholars and poets in the mid third century,very similar with what Henry Thoreau describes in his "Walden, Life in the Woods".

Well ... a nice challenge I think ... have fun!

This Renga With Basho episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 18th at noon (CEST). Have fun. Enjoy this nice exercise to create a renga together with one of the most famous haiku poets ... Matsuo Basho.

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (7) grasses wilt


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First ... my apologies for being this late with publishing our new TRC. I had a very busy evening shift in the hospital.

This month we have our 3rd edition of the TRC-month in which I challenge you to complete a Tan Renga with a given haiku by a classical or non-classical haiku poet. Today I have a nice haiku for you to work with by Seishi.

This haiku I found (again) on the same website as the haiku of yesterday by Patrick Blanche. This haiku is also in a translation by Burch.

Here is the haiku to work with:

grasses wilt:
the braking locomotive
grinds to a halt.

©️ Yamaguchi Seishi, (Tr. Michael R. Burch)

Steamengine on the railroad at Takanawa (woodblockprint by Ikkei)

As I read this haiku by Seishi I immediately thought of that nice haiku by Shiki:

smoke whirls
after the passage of a train.
young foliage.

© Shiki

Two beautiful haiku I would say, but the TRC for today is to create a Tan Renga with the haiku by Seishi, but if you also would like to create a Tan Renga with the haiku by Shiki than feel free to do as you like.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 17th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, September 9, 2018

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge September 2018 Chained Together III (6) An Apple, Alone



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a joy this month already is. I have read wonderful continuations and it seems that you all like this TRC-month. I hope you have had a wonderful weekend. I had for sure a good weekend, but a busy one, because I had to work (all evening shifts), but ... well I am an oncology nurse so to me every shift has its challenges, like we have our TRC's this month (smiles).

Today I have a wonderful haiku for you written by the French haiku-poet Patrick Blanche. I think it's a nice haiku to create a Tan Renga with.

Red Apples In A Basket
Here is the haiku by Patrick Blanche, first I will give you the French version:

Une pomme, seul
dans le verger abandonné
rougissent pour l'hiver

Patrick Blanche

But of course I cannot ask you to create a Tan Renga from a French haiku, so here is the translation by Michael R. Burch:


One apple, alone
in the abandoned orchard reddens for winter
Patrick Blanche (Tr. Michael R. Burch)

A wonderful haiku to work with I would say. So have fun!

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until September 16th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Saturday, September 8, 2018

Carpe Diem Extra September 8th 2018 Restarting Tanka Splendor On Wordpress


Dear Haijin, visitors an travelers,

I have "restarted" our Tanka-part of our CDHK family on Wordpress. Maybe you can remember Tanka Splendor through lack of time I hadn't the possibility to edit that part of our CDHK family, but I have re-opened it just to give you more places to create your Japanese poetry.
Tanka Splendor you can find HERE

I have published already a new theme at Tanka Splendor. That theme is "autumn leaves"

Have fun!

Chèvrefeuille, your host

Friday, September 7, 2018

Carpe Diem's Weekend Meditiation #49 Clouds and Waves by Rabindranath Tagore


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday September 9th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new CDHK Weekend Meditation. As you know this month all the Weekend Meditations are a kind of "distillations". What does that mean? Well I will give you a long poem and you have to catch the essence of the long poem in a haiku or tanka.

This month I have chosen all poems by Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), last weekend I challenged you with a poem extracted from his world famous "Gitanjali" and this weekend I have found a beautiful poem written by him on poemhunter.com "clouds and waves".

Clouds And Waves (taken from Panoramio.com, website doesn't exist anymore)

Clouds And Waves:

Mother, the folk who live up in the clouds call out to me-
"We play from the time we wake till the day ends.
We play with the golden dawn, we play with the silver moon."
I ask, "But how am I to get up to you ?"
They answer, "Come to the edge of the earth, lift up your
hands to the sky, and you will be taken up into the clouds."
"My mother is waiting for me at home, "I say, "How can I leave
her and come?"
Then they smile and float away.
But I know a nicer game than that, mother.
I shall be the cloud and you the moon.
I shall cover you with both my hands, and our house-top will
be the blue sky.
The folk who live in the waves call out to me-
"We sing from morning till night; on and on we travel and know
not where we pass."
I ask, "But how am I to join you?"
They tell me, "Come to the edge of the shore and stand with
your eyes tight shut, and you will be carried out upon the waves."
I say, "My mother always wants me at home in the everything-
how can I leave her and go?"
They smile, dance and pass by.
But I know a better game than that.
I will be the waves and you will be a strange shore.
I shall roll on and on and on, and break upon your lap with
laughter.
And no one in the world will know where we both are.
   
©️ Rabindranath Tagore

A wonderful poem. I am exited to read your responses, your "distillations". Well have an awesome weekend.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday September 9th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until September 16th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new regular episode around that same time.