Sunday, November 30, 2014

Carpe Diem #616, "accepting the finite"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new month of Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. December 2014 will be another awesome month as we are starting today with counting down to New Year's Eve. As you could have read in our new prompt list (which you can find above in the menu) this month I have chosen prompts from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", a modern kigo Saijiki. All our prompts this month will be modern kigo (season words) for winter.
First I want to thank you all for your kind words sprinkled on me in response on the post of the last day of November. I am glad that you all like Carpe Diem Haiku Kai and that makes me happy. I also want to apologize for not being that strong in commenting on all your wonderful posts, it's taking to much time. Of course I will visit all of your submissions, but forgive me ... if I don't have left a comment. I hope to catch up commenting from today ...
Second ... I have a little gift for you all ... I have created/compiled a little anthology in response of the "Just Read" episode about "the moon tradition in haiku". You can find it at the left of your screen. It's free to download and I hope you will like it all. If I haven't used your haiku than there was no permission given, but if you want your haiku included than let me know and I will make a new version of this little e-book which I have called "for the sake of the moon". (PS. The image is not the cover, because the original cover is on the PC at my work).



Ok ... here we go ... our first prompt of December 2014. The first prompt, accepting the finite, is a very strong prompt, but also one full of sadness and tears. It's not easy to accept the finite. As I look at my own situation than I still can't accept the idea that my older brother already has passed away. He was to young to die, he was just 35 in the strength of his life, a great job (in which he had two months before he died given promotion for) and he lived very healthy ... but the cancer took him.
I have given his dead a place in my mind and heart, but still haven't accepted it ... I maybe will never accept it.

In "A Dictionary of Haiku", Jane gives a nice series of haiku as example for this prompt. It takes to much to reproduce them all here, but I have two haiku for you as an example. I think these haiku are very strong, but I like the first the most.

still standing
where others lived
abandoned cabin

dusting the dresser
a gown which shared
our passion

© Jane Reichhold

I have said nothing to much I think, both are beauties and it will be not an easy task to write an all new haiku on "accepting the finite".
I have tried to write a cascading haiku as a kind of tribute to my brother who died at lung cancer almost 20 years ago. It's ... maybe my kind of trying to accept the finite ... finally ...

his eyes went dark
a journey to heaven started
brought new light

brought new light
in Gods heavenly home
the glory of life

the glory of life
cherry blossoms blooming
above his grave

God's Heavenly Home

above his grave
the skylark is glorifying
his Creator

his Creator
brought new life to the world
somewhere

somewhere
some day ... maybe I can accept
the finite

© Chèvrefeuille

This cascading haiku, ... the wave of life ..., the wave of a resurrection once ... my dear brother we will meet again.

This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7.00 PM (CET) and will remain open until December 3rd at noon (CET). I will (try to) post our new episode, delight in company, later on. For now ... be inspired and share your haiku with us all.


22 comments:

  1. KP please don't worry about not commenting on all of our posts. We are all busy adults. As far as I am concerned one of the best things about your poetry site is that there is no pressure by admonishments insisting on comments be made, unlike some other poetry sites which practise an infant school policy namely, if your receive a comment you must reciprocate . Of course everyone would do this given time and inclination.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well said. I work with a team blog poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com and some of our team members deal with very serious mental illness. Some of them are at times not up to responding to comments, but we all always appreciate them.

      Delete
    2. How beautiful your words are. I am sorry for the loss of your brother.
      http://poetryofthenetherworld.blogspot.com/2014/11/accepting-finite.html

      Delete
    3. Totally agree with rallentanda. I comment when I am moved to comment and as a result my comments come from the heart, not out of slavish obligation. I hope people aren't posting out of obligation.

      As for the e-book "for the sake of the moon." It's beautiful, Chevrefuille. Well done.

      Delete
    4. Thank you for saying this, Rallentanda -- this is the main reason I stopped participating at several other prompt sites.

      Delete
  2. Hear! Hear!
    [ and down with the infant schools of poetry :-)]

    We write for ourselves, aided by the opportunities you give us.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very touching post Chevrefeuille.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I totally agree with rallentanda, your prompts already speak to us in your voice every day. And I also love this about CP, we are not scolded or pressured to read which makes us want to read more (grins) yet carry no guilt if we cannot.With the holidays coming up, preparations, work sometimes more demanding in your field especially...I do remember in homecare...we are also busier at our crisis lines...I appreciate everything you do for us here.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That is a great ebook - so very nicely done. My suggestion is that after it builds you could upload it on kobo.com or lulu.com for general distribution.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi.. yes it's tough to comment on all the post. I will try to be a little bit more active in december.. and personally I learn so much by reading all the splendid poetry so I cannot abstain from commenting.. but I have also missed out so much lately.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your brother lives on in your heart and memory, as well as in his heavenly home. Thanks for sharing your heartfelt haiku with us and letting us participate in your wonderful prompts...no apologies necessary!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Your brother lives on in your heart and memory. Thank you for sharing your heartfelt haiku and letting us participate in your wonderful prompts...no apologies necessary!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Kristjaan, I'm not a very "huggy" type of person -- but sending a hug along anyway. This is a beautiful post -- and a wonderful series that ends on such a hopeful note.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Off topic, perhaps -- but the recent comics at Old Pond Comics have been wonderful. And everyone who thinks haiku is "easy" should follow along. We can all relate to the poor tadpole!

    http://oldpondcomics.wordpress.com/2014/11/29/how-long-it-takes-to-write-a-haiku/

    So hats off, again, to Kristjaan -- for not only keeping the prompts flowing and visiting everyone but creating new haiku to go along with it all. :D

    ReplyDelete
  11. You are always welcome to use my haiku with credits so you may add it to your book if you make a new version (if you have one you like). I agree you need not worry about keeping up with comments. I try to read everyone's haiku but sometimes fall behind--we're all busy. As always, grateful for all the work you do!

    ReplyDelete
  12. p.s. it just took my comment and it said I was anonymous even though I put in my identity....the comment about commenting and you may use my haiku was Cathy from Haiku Plate Special.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Beautiful tribute to your brother. I lost my own brother when he turned 13. It is always hard to accept. My family never spoke of him until I wrote a book of haiku and tanka sharing everyone's favorite childhood memories 22 years latter. I gave them out during a Christmas dinner, where they had to sit and talk. So much healing and sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I think we all know how difficult it is to comment everyone's efforts, and how much more for you who also create these wonderful prompts. I'm happy to participate and for me that is a wonderful thing. Thanks for all your efforts and also for this wonderful anthology that you put together!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I am more than a tad behind on returns visits. I hope to eventually catch up. It does not mean that I am disregarding those who have been kind enough to visit - but life beyond or before or any other descriptive word one wants to use 'outside' of the 'net' comes first.

    So I agree with Rallentanda. If writing is the goal then we all need to accept that writing comes first without related stress of obligatory returns. Some folks make it difficult to visit by not giving us easy options. And other that, they do make us smile even if we can't get to comment right away - I think they also know and understand that we enjoy them even when we are late in showing our appreciation. And it is for those (as well as ourselves) that we write for. So thank you Kristjaan for the prompts and the place to put them.

    And thanks to for the e-books. I, being technically challenged didn't realize how easy they were to access and just read your gift 'For the Sake of the Moon' this morning. Thank you for the honor of being a part of such a lovely collection.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Moving post, beautiful cascading haiku and it seems your very occupation is a living tribute to your brother's memory. And comments not required! Blessings and comfort.

    ReplyDelete
  17. This is the gift of remembrance to your brother. Heartfelt beauty

    ReplyDelete