Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Carpe Diem #1590 bean soup


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Here in The Netherlands finally we have the feeling of winter. Frost and snow and of course skating. The Dutch are real winter people and as it starts to freeze and the waters are becoming ice ... we all become "insane". Winter has really started ... and than we are in for bean soup ... real winter soup and that's the modern kigo for today ... bean soup ... again extracted from Jane's "A Dictionary of Haiku".

Here are a few haiku written by Jane themed "bean soup":

cold rain
falling into bean soup
chopped onions

soup cooking
in the wood stove too
rain on the roof

out shouting
rain on the roof
bean soup

© Jane Reichhold (Extracted from her Saijiki)

Bean Soup
after skating
together with my loved ones
eating bean soup

© Chèvrefeuille

Look at that bean soup ... mouth watering ...

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 29th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Monday, January 21, 2019

Carpe Diem #1589 mandarin ducks (oshidori)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I had a busy day today so I have a reprise episode for you this time. Maybe you can remember that we have had "mandarin ducks" as a prompt several times here at CDHK. "Mandarin Ducks" is a classical kigo for winter and there are nice haiku with this kigo for example:

furu ike no oshidori ni yuki furu yuube kana

at the old pond
snow falls on Mandarin ducks
in twilight

© Matsuo Basho (1644-1694)

Or what do you think of this one by Yosa Buson:

oshidoriya ikeni otonaki kashino ame

mandarin duck -
rain falls silently
from an oak

© Yosa Buson (Tr. Chèvrefeuille)

Mandarin Ducks
The adult male (sometimes called 'drake' for his colorful feathers) is a striking and unmistakable bird. It has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and "whiskers". The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange "sails" at the back. The female is similar to female Wood Duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill.
The Mandarin ducklings are almost identical in look to Wood ducklings, and appear very similar to Mallard ducklings. The ducklings can be distinguished from Mallard ducklings because the eye-stripe of Mandarin ducklings (and Wood ducklings) stops at the eye, while in Mallard ducklings it reaches all the way to the bill.

Here are a few haiku from my archive themed "Mandarin Ducks":

in the moonlight 
Mandarin Ducks making love
happily together

brilliant colors
reflecting in the old pond
Mandarin drake

© Chèvrefeuille

And here is another one, also from my archive, but more inspired on the beautiful colors of the Mandarin Duck:

without sound
colored leaves dive into
the city park pond

© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 28th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!


Sunday, January 20, 2019

Carpe Diem #1588 delight in company


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend full of inspiration. I had a nice weekend, relaxing and taking time with my loved ones. I really enjoy the time I can share with my loved ones and that's also the theme for this new episode.

This month we are exploring classical and modern kigo (seasonwords) for winter and today I have a nice modern kigo for you taken from Jane Reichhold's Saijiki "A Dictionary of Haiku". And that modern kigo has everything to do with enjoying the company of loved ones ... the theme today is "delight in company" and that's very important for everyone I think.

Delight In Company (©photo Anna Ivanova)
Ofcourse "delight in company" is not specific for winter, but I think in winter we enjoy it more than in the other seasons. The evenings and nights are longer and mostly in this time of year we enjoy the romance of candlelight and soft music ...

I love this time of year and I am enjoying the company of my beloved ones. In her Saijiki Jane Reichhold gives us a few wonderful examples of haiku in which she uses this modern kigo. So here are a few of those haiku to awaken your muses.

a new winter friend
up the year's steep sloping
our flow of words

bird song
under winter quilts
bodies touching

curved ink
the warmth of your hand
in the letters

© Jane Reichhold (extracted from "A Dictionary of Haiku")

By the way the first haiku of the above series she wrote for a friend.

fireplace (still from a you tube clip)

warm embrace
in front of the fireplace
I see stars

© Chèvrefeuille

A nice romantic haiku I think ... isn't that what delight in company can mean also?

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 27th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.

Friday, January 18, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #68 Tan Renga With Jane Reichhold "her gentle spirit"


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new weekend meditation, that special feature for the weekend here at CDHK. Today, January 18th, Jane would have become 82 yrs. You all know that she decided to end her life herself, because she couldn't longer live with the pain of fibromyalgia ... so this weekend I will reshare an episode of our month in honor of Jane back in 2016:




Today I have chosen another nice modern kigo extracted from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku", a complete saijiki in which Jane gathered modern kigo and gave examples of all those modern kigo by creating wonderful haiku. Today I hope to inspire you with calm through the following haiku by Jane:

a certain calm
in summer's passing
flowers

flat seas
with the butterfly's flight
a certain calm

the hour silent
before the birds awake
waves on sand

© Jane Reichhold

These haiku are wonderful and I can read Jane's fingerprints all over them. In a way Jane Reichhold created the "western" haiku without losing the respect for the Japanese haiku. She created beauty and shared it with the world. Without her the "western" haiku had died long ago, but that's my humble opinion.



As I read the above trio of haiku I felt Jane's presence and that inspired me to create the following haiku:

her gentle spirit
the calm of an early morning
a bird's song

© Chèvrefeuille

I love this haiku ... one of my best I would say (how immodest) ... Jane and I are connected in a very nice spiritual way and I hope to feel her presence forever.

The challenge for this weekend meditation is to create Tan Renga with the above three given haiku by Jane Reichhold. A Tan Renga looks like a Tanka, but is written by two poets instead of one poet. It's a kind of chained poem. You have to create the second stanza of each Tan Renga. (See also above in the menu)

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday January 20th at 7:00 PM (CET) and will remain open until January 27th at noon (CET). Have a great weekend!


Thursday, January 17, 2019

Carpe Diem #1587 Buson's Memorial Day (busonki) (January 17th)

 

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. Today it's January 17th and that is Buson's Memorial Day (or busonki) and it's also a classical kigo for winter. So according to the meaning of this day ... Buson's Memorial Day ... I have a nice challenge for you all ... create a "fusion-ku" from the two haiku I will give you hereafter ... and create a Troiku with your "fusion-ku".

Here are the two haiku by Buson to use:

someone goes by wearing a hood
in his own darkness
not seeing the harvest moon

the first light snow
then when the bowl of the sky is empty
the moon hanging in the bamboos

© Yosa Buson

Haiga by Buson
Two nice haiku by Buson, but Buson was also a great Haiga painter as you can see above. He illustrated the first bound edition of Basho's "Oku No Hosomichi" (Small Road Into The Deep North).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 24th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Carpe Diem #1586 withered leaves


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

"Withered leaves" is our modern kigo for today's episode. It's taken from Jane Reichhold's "A Dictionary of Haiku" section: winter, subsection: plants. A wonderful modern kigo to work with I think so no further explanation needed.

Withered Leaves
And to awaken your muses ... here are a few haiku extracted from Jane's Saijiki as examples for this modern kigo:

up to a branch
wind took a winter leaf
let it fall again

snow
cooling the colors
withered leaves

frost spikes
the growing cold
of withered leaves

© Jane Reichhold

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 23rd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our next episode later on.


Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1585 icicles (tsurara)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Kai. The place to be if you like to write and share haiku or other kinds of Japanese poetry. This month we are exploring modern and classical seasonwords for winter. And today I have a nice classical kigo (seasonword) for you.

The prompt for today is Icicles (tsurara) and that's a classical kigo for "late winter", but in my opinion that's not completely true, because Icicles we see through whole winter.

I have found a wonderful haiku on 'icicles' written by Issa:

yûkaze ya yashiro no tsurara hi no utsuru

night wind --
the shrine's icicles
reflect the lights

© Kobayashi Issa

Icicles (image found on Pixabay)

Well ... now it's my turn ...

icicles hanging
at the gutter of the old mansion
sun's reflections

© Chèvrefeuille

I think icicles are the most beautiful thing of winter, they are so fragile and look like crystals.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until January 22nd at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!