Thursday, August 22, 2019

Carpe Diem #1731 Cahaba Lily


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our wonderful month of creating a bouquet of wildflowers. Today I have a wonderful field flower for you to work with. I have to say I had never heard of this beautiful wildflower, Cahaba Lily, This wildflower looks so fragile and beautiful ... and for sure it would be an awesome part of our bouquet of wildflowers.

Cahaba Lily (photo © Keith Boseman)

Cahaba Lily
a small star shining bright
in the meadow


© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 29th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on. For now ... have fun and enjoy the beauty of the Cahaba Lily.


Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Carpe Diem #1730 Field Of Flowers --- free-style


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a wonderful month this is. We are creating a bouquet of wildflowers and we have seen already a lot of beautiful wildflowers. Today I will give you the freedom to create a haiku, tanka or other Japanese poetry form inspired on our month theme "Field Of Flowers". It's a so called "free-style" episode ... no need to follow the rules, the o nly thing you have to do is use our month theme in anyway you want.
Forget Me Nots

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 28th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1729 Wildflower variety --- Use That Quote


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First my apologies for being late with publishing, but I hadn't time to publish it on time. Today I have a nice quote by the Persian poet Rumi. I think you can remember that we had a month full of Persian poetry last year, so I thought I will use a quote for today's episode. I think it's a wonderful quote to work with:

[...] “There are as many ways of loving as there are people, and that wildflower variety is the great beauty of this dimension of existence.” [...]  (Rumi)

Ofcourse there is a small task to work with today. I love to read a lovepoem in which you use love and wildflowers. You can create a haiku, tanka or another beautiful form of Japanese poetry, like Sedoka or Choka.

Summer Wildflowers

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 27th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!!


Monday, August 19, 2019

Carpe Diem #1728 Columbine


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our wonderful month about "field of flowers" ... we are creating a bouquet of wild flowers (or flowers from the field). We have had already wonderful wild flowers this month and today another beauty will be shown ... Columbine (or Aquilegia).


Columbine (Aquilegia)

Look at this beautiful wild flower ... its nice pink color and their shape, like bells, wonderful.

between summer grasses
the sweet sound of pink colored bells
columbine praises


© Chèvrefeuille

Not a very strong haiku, but I like the "personality" that is given to the Columbine.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 26th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... be inspired and have fun!


Sunday, August 18, 2019

Carpe Diem #1727 Milkweed ...


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

A new week is ahead of us ... another wonderful week in which we will create a bouquet of wildflowers ... today I have a very nice wild flower for you to work with, but first I have something else.

Next October we will celebrate our 7th anniversary and as you all know I am always trying to make that month a real celebration and I hope to do that this year too, but I need your help with it. Do you have ideas for our anniversary month? Than please share them with us trhough the comments field of this episode. I am looking forward to all of your wonderful ideas.


(Butterfly) Milkweed (photo © Tom Koerner)

Okay back to our episode. Today I have chosen for "milkweed".Butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa)grows 1-3 feet tall and has flat-topped clusters of orange flowers. Unlike many other flowers that have two whorls, milkweeds have three whorled flowers. The inner whorl is known as the corolla, above that is the corona, and the outermost whorl of sepals is the calyx. The leaves of the butterfly milkweed are stiff and lance-shaped. They differ from all other milkweeds in that they are alternate and do not produce milky white sap. Butterfly milkweedis a perennial herb and flowers throughout June and August. The flowers are followed by green spindle-shaped pods that open and release silky tufted seeds that are wind dispersed.

A beautiful wild flower I think to work with.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 25th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #98 Choka ... the long Japanese poem


!! Open for your submissions tomorrow Sunday 18th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at this delayed weekend meditation. My apologies (again) for being late I hadn't time enough to publish this weekend meditation earlier.

This weekend I love to challenge you to create a Japanese long poem, or Choka. Let me tell you a little bit more about the Choka.
The choka can be of almost any length, because its form depends on alternating phrases (or lines) containing either seven of five sound units (onji). The end of the poem is signaled by two lines of seven sounds. So the form is five/seven, five/seven, five seven, .... , seven/seven.
This was the most popular form of poetry in the 9th century as indicated by the large number of works in the celebrated anthology Man'yoshu (The Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves). This anthology of anthologies contained 260 choka and 4200 tanka.

Kakinomoto no Hitomaru

The poet Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, who composed most of his work in the last decade of the 7th century, took the choka to its highest lyrical point with his finesse in the use of ritual language.
The connection to tanka is evidenced by the envoy or hanka - a tanka-like poem attached at the end of the choka. Occasionally more than one envoy will close the choka. There have been a few efforts to revivie the form over the intervening centuries, but the form has failed to gain any popularity in Japan, and even less has been accomplished in English. (Based on Jane Reichhold's "Writing and Enjoying Haiku")

Here is an example of a choka from the Man'yoshu (no. 802):

The briefest chōka documented is Man'yōshū no. 802, which is of a pattern 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7-7. It was composed in the Nara period and goes:

When I eat melons
My children come to my mind;
When I eat chestnuts
The longing is even worse.
Where do they come from,
Flickering before my eyes.
Making me helpless
Endlessly night after night.
Not letting me sleep in peace?

(envoy or hanka)

What are they to me,
Silver, or gold, or jewels?
How could they ever
Equal the greater treasure
That is a child? They cannot.

© Yamanoue no Okura (Tr. Edwin Cranston)


My personal weblog: Chèvrefeuille's Haikublog

I once wrote a choka (and published it on my personal weblog), but it isn't really my "cup of tea", but I love to share it here with you all:

the cooing of pigeons
resonates through the gray streets –
ah! that summer rain
refreshes the dried out earth
filling its scars
the perfume of earth tickles
my nostrils
after the hot summer days
I dance in the rain
naked on the top of the hills
I feel free at last
nature around me comes to life
field flowers bloom
I see their beautiful colors
the perfume of Honeysuckle

ah! that summer rain
the perfume of the moist soil
tickles my senses
I lay down, naked in her arms
surrounded by Honeysuckle

© Chèvrefeuille

It's a very nice form of Japanese poetry, but as I said above not "my cup of tea", but maybe it'is your "cup of tea". 

PS. You can choose your own theme.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday August 18th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until August 25th at noon (CEST). Have a wonderful weekend ... or maybe I have to say "have a wonderful Sunday".

Friday, August 16, 2019

Delayed post

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I don't have time to publish our new weekend meditation today. So I will try to publish it tomorrow.

My excuses for the inconvenience.

Namasté,

Chèvrefeuille, your host.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Carpe Diem #1726 Peony (troiku)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Our bouquet of wild flowers grows every day, but today I don't have chosen a real wild flower, but more suitable for your garden, but it can be used in bouquets, so I think today's summer flower fits really good in our bouquet of wild flowers.

Today I have chosen for the Peony, a wonderful flower that comes in a lot of varieties. The challenge for today is to create a haiku themed Peony and create a Troiku with it. (More on Troiku you can find above in the menu).


Peony

Well ... I think no need to say more. I am looking forward to your wonderful inspired Troiku. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 22nd at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on today.


Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Carpe Diem #1725 Scarlet Pimpernel


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a joyful month this is ... all those gorgeous wild flowers we have seen already this month. We are creating a wonderful bouquet of wild flowers ...

Today I have another wonderful wild flower for you to work with. This time I have chosen for the "Scarlet Pimpernel". The first thing I thought of was that character "Scarlet Pimpernel", maybe you have heard about him, but that's for another time.


Scarlet Pimpernel

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 21st at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Carpe Diem #1724 Cornflower


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

We are continuing or creation of our summer wild flower bouquet with an other wonderful wild flower. I like this wild flower for it's wonderful color and I hope you will enjoy this episode.

In this episode I have chosen for the Cornflower ... I found an example of a haiku on cornflower in my archives:

beautiful and fragile
cornflowers sway on the breeze
inspiration flows

© Chèvrefeuille

Cornflower

And now it's up to you.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 20th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on.


Monday, August 12, 2019

Carpe Diem #1723 Honeysuckle


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our wonderful month in which we are creating a bouquet of wild flowers and today I have chosen the flower from which I took my "nom de plume" ... the Honeysuckle.

As a haiku poet I use a "haigo" or "penname" and as you know my "haigo" is Chèvrefeuille (French for Honeysuckle). I am a Dutch haiku poet and I write almost all my haiku in English. I even find it very difficult to create haiku in my own language, Dutch. Sometimes I even think in English and that's sometimes, e.g. at work, a "pain in the a..", but I cannot help it.




For today's prompt I have chosen a haiku in which my "haigo" is used.

sweet perfume
lingers in the warm summer night
Honeysuckle blooms

© Chèvrefeuille

And here is an oldie from my archives:

searching my inner self
following the way of Honeysuckle
path of wisdom*

© Chèvrefeuille

* Honeysuckle, in her spiritual meaning is the path of wisdom to find your inner self.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 19th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Carpe Diem #1722 Yarrow ...


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

I hope you all have had a wonderful weekend, full of inspiration. I had a very busy weekend at work, so I will not share a very large episode today.

This month we are creating a bouquet of field flowers and today I have chosen (again) for a not so well known summer flower ... the Yarrow. The Yarrow (or Achillea millefolium), is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America. It has been introduced as a feed for livestock in places like New Zealand and Australia, where it is a common herb of both wet and dry areas, such as roadsides, meadows, fields and coastal places.

In New Mexico and southern Colorado, it is called plumajillo (Spanish for 'little feather') from its leaf shape and texture. In antiquity, yarrow was known as herbal militaris, for its use in stanching the flow of blood from wounds.


Yarrow or Achillea millefolium (photo © Thayne Tuason

wounded soldier
white petals turn red -
mooing of a cow


© Chèvrefeuille

A not so commonly way of creating haiku, but I tried to catch a few of the uses of this Yarrow in the haiku. I think I succeeded (how immodest).

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 18th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now .... have fun!


Saturday, August 10, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #97 depth of a flower (CD Crossroads)


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday August 11th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First my apologies for being late with publishing of this new weekend meditation, I hadn't time earlier, but now I have found some time to create it.

This weekend I love to challenge you with a Crossroads episode. A Crossroads episode challenges you to create a "fusion"-haiku from two given haiku and create a troiku with your fusion-haiku (more about Troiku above in the menu).

Wildflower Bouquet

As you all know this month we are creating a bouquet of field flowers, so I have chosen two haiku in which field flowers are used. I have chosen two haiku by Jane Reichhold, taken from her "A Dictionary of Haiku", section: summer, subsection: plants. Here are the two haiku to work with:

windy weather
calling the flowers by name
each nods

depth of a flower
flying away with the bee
some mystery

© Jane Reichhold (source: A Dictionary of Haiku)

Two beauties by Jane, she is still missed. Enjoy this weekend meditation.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday August 11th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until August 18th at noon (CEST). Have an awesome weekend full of inspiration.


Thursday, August 8, 2019

Carpe Diem #1721 Canna Lily


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our wonderful Haiku Kai, the place to be if you like to create Japanese poetry and share it with the world. This month we are creating a bouquet of field flowers and today I have another nice flower for you, which not always is seen in wild nature, but often in gardens, but it can be used in a bouquet. Today I have chosen "Canna Lily", and it is a gorgeous flower.


Canna Lily "Firebird"

The cannas in your garden will keep you ensured of colour around you from spring right through to the end of summer. And the colour that semi-dwarf Canna 'Firebird' provides is one you will want to be there for a good long while. This plants tall spikes bear a clump of bright red blooms at the top which open in succession. Cutting old stems will ensure that the flowering continues as long as possible. Canna 'Firebird' has long upright blue green leaves which set off the flowers to perfection.

fireworks in my garden
canna lillies blooming in bright colors
I feel rich


© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submisisons and will remain open until August 15th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new weekend meditation later on. For now ... have fun and enjoy the "fireworks" in your garden.


Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Carpe Diem #1720 Zinnia


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our wonderful "field of flowers" month here at our wonderful Haiku Kai, the place to be if you like to write and share Japanese poetry with the world. I am grateful that CDHK is still alive and kicking and I am so glad to see even new faces, new names appear here ... that makes me proud.

Zinnia

Today I have chosen a nice prompt, "Zinnia". You’ll find zinnias in nearly any color you’re looking for—pink, orange, yellow, red, white, purple, and more, meaning there’s probably a beautiful option to fit the vision of nearly any gardener. As an annual, they will only last one season, but they put on quite the display while they’re around. Zinnias grow well and look great in a number of settings whether it’s in a garden, container, or window box. Because of their beautiful shape and vibrant colors, zinnias are also very popular as cut flowers. (Zinnias grow and bloom from March to October).

Look at the above image of "Zinnia" it's really a game of colors ... awesome don't you think so too? I have to say that I didn't know this flower, but I like it very much. So I have tried to create a haiku about it:

winter's twilight zone
first colors in the backyard
zinnias are blooming


© Chèvrefeuille

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 14th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... enjoy a rainbow of zinnias.


Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Carpe Diem #1719 Daisies ... Troiku challenge


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

We are busy with creating a bouquet of field flowers here at CDHK. Today I have another wonderful prompt for you and I think a nice challenge to work with. Today I have chosen "daisies" as our prompt and I love to challenge you to create a Troiku with a given haiku.

Here is the haiu to create your Troiku with, it's taken from my personal weblog on haiku and I wrote it back in 2012 for a weekly theme weblog titled "Haiku Heights":

around the mansion
daisies standing strong together
after the storm

© Chèvrefeuille (2012)


daisies standing strong together

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 13th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... enjoy the daisies in your neighborhood.

More about Troiku you can find above in the menu.


Carpe Diem #1718 Bougainvillea (CD Imagination)


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode in our wonderful CDHK-month "Field Of Flowers", only today I have chosen not a "real" field flower, but a flowering bush called "Bougainvillea". The Bougainvillea is often seen as wall decoration against white walls, mostly in the more southern countries, like for example Spain and Turkey.

Today I love to challenge you to create a Japanese poem inspired on a given image, so you can say this is a CDHK Imagination episode. Ofcourse you can use your own image, but it has to be an image of the Bougainvillea.

Here is the image for your inspiration:




This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 12th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, August 4, 2019

Carpe Diem #1717 Sunflowers


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new episode of our "Field Of Flowers" month. Today I have chosen "sunflower" to work with. I have written several haiku about sunflowers, so I will give you a few examples:

bruised sunflower
it bowed its head to deep -
departure of summer

in the light of dawn
sunflowers reach to the blue sky
praising their Creator

© Chèvrefeuille


And a last one from my archives:

broken sunflower
torn apart through a rain storm -
puddles on the path

© Chèvrefeuille

I love Sunflowers, they look like suns and they bring me a lot of joy, just like the sun. I hope you all are inspired to create haiku, tanka or other form of Japanese poetry about sunflowers.

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 11th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Friday, August 2, 2019

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #96 Little Ones ... Sedoka


!! Open for your submissions next Sunday August 4th at 7:00 PM (CEST) !!

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the first weekend meditation of August 2019. This month our theme is "Field Of Flowers", but that's not the theme for this weekend meditation. For this weekend meditation I have chosen to challenge you to create an other kind of Japanese poetry ... Sedoka. I will explain what Sedoka is.

For this "special feature "Little Ones" I have created a new logo and maybe I will use this special feature more often here at CDHK, not only in the weekends, but maybe also as an extra feature on weekdays.


For this logo I have used a renown Japanese woodblock by Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) and it's titled: Under the Wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa oki nami ura), also known as The Great Wave.

Maybe you can remember that special feature "Little Ones" that I used often here at CDHK, maybe if you are a long time member you will surely know that special feature.

Sedoka:

A Sedoka is an unrhymed poem composed of two katauta. A katauta has three lines with the syllable pattern 5-7-7 and is complete in itself and able to stand alone. A Sedoka therefore has the syllable count: 5-7-7, 5-7-7.

In order to be correct, each katauta must be able to be read independently, but also create a cohesive singular work in the Sedoka. Often a Sedoka will address the same subject from different perspectives.

An example:

dark clouds cloak the night;
chilly winds creak gnarled branches,
grasping as bony fingers.

disturbed raven squawks
at frightened children - screaming,
then laughing - they throw him treats

© James Dean Chase

Face In The Mirror (image found on viewbug) (image © beamiyoung)

Here is a Sedoka I wrote several years ago:

behind a veil of clouds
she hides her bright face
she ... the queen of night's sky

in the mirror she looks
at her once beautiful face
mother of two boys and girls

© Chèvrefeuille

I think it's a nice Japanese poetry form and next to haiku and tanka, I think Sedoka fits us all. Try it yourself.

This weekend meditation is open for your submissions next Sunday August 4th at 7:00 PM (CEST) and will remain open until August 11th at noon (CEST). Have a great weekend!


Carpe Diem #1716 Poppies


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the 2nd episode of our new CDHK month August 2019. This month we are "creating" a field of flowers, all prompts will be flowers that we can find in the fields around us. We will see a lot of beautiful flowers ... Today I have chosen "poppies" to work with.

Today I love to start with a "reprise" from an episode of one of my other weblogs, Basho Revisited. So a haiku by my master, Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) and a little background on it.




shira geshi ya   shigure no hana no   saki tsu ran

white poppy
it must have bloomed
from a wintry shower

© Matsuo Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

As you can see ... this haiku is in Kanshicho-style. Let's take a closer look at the Romanji text and count the characters (syllables).

shi-ra ge-shi ya (5 syllables or characters)
shi-gu-re no ha-na no (7 syllables or characters)
sa-ki tsu ran (4 syllables or characters)

And now let us look at the English translation. Is that also in Kanshicho?

white poppy (2 syllables)
it must have bloomed (5 syllables)
from a wintry shower (5 syllables)

The English haiku is also in Kanshicho. Kanshicho is just another way of writing haiku.  In our Western world we use our own way of translating the Japanese haiku and that's not always following the classical syllables-count. So maybe we can say that all Western haiku are in Kanshicho?
Well maybe, but as you and I know, in the Western world we have a lot of classical written haiku, sometimes convulsively counted to serve the rules of the classical syllables-count 5-7-5. I am not a fan of that classical style, counted verse, but I do like to write them sometimes. To me the classical way of writing haiku is very difficult. Maybe that's because English isn't my mother tongue.
By the way. The haiku written by Basho, the one in this episode, was published in a three-volume collection of haikai by Ochi Etsujin in 1717.




At Basho Revisited I try to create haiku inspired on the haiku by Basho trying to "touch" the same tone and sphere. So here is the haiku I created:

at sunrise
poppies still redder
sacrifice for God

© Chèvrefeuille

Awesome! Gorgeous haiku in Kanshicho-style. Hope you enjoyed the read and of course the whole episode.

To conclude this episode I have another haiku for you:

one summer day
poppies coloring the meadows -
raindrops start to fall

© Chèvrefeuille

Well ... a nice one don't you think so too? This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until Auhust 9th at noon (CEST). Later today I will publish our new weekend meditation, so today ... two episodes to read. Have fun!



Thursday, August 1, 2019

Carpe Diem #1715 Field Of Flowers ...


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at a new month of creativity with all kinds of Japanese poetry ... our wonderful haiku family Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. This month I have chosen to use only flower prompts. This month the theme I have chosen is "Field Of Flowers" and this is our first prompt of August ... Fields Of Flowers.

along our life's path
straight through the meadow of love -
a field of flowers

© Chèvrefeuille




This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 8th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Delayed post

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Our new episode, the first of August is delayed. I hope to publish later today.

Namasté,

Chėvrefeuille, your host.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Carpe Diem #1714 Summer Has Ended ... free styling


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

First my apologies for being late with this last episode of July 2019, I had a busy evening shift. Here it is the last episode of our Summer Love month and in this last episode you can choose your own Summer Love prompt. So this is a "free-styling" episode. Feel free to choose your prompt, feel free to create any kind of Japanese poetry and share it with us all here at our wonderful Kai.

This month was a joy to create and I hope you all did enjoy it.


End Of Summer
This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 6th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our first episode of August later on ... I don't have decided what theme we will have ... so that will be a surprise for us all.


Monday, July 29, 2019

Carpe Diem #1713 Summer Love ... a full circle challenge


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at the penultimate episode of this wonderful CDHK "Summer Love" month. All the prompts were in a way connected to summer love and you all did a great job on this theme. Today I have chosen an episode of one of our not so renown special features, "Full Circle".

Let me tell you what the goal is of this feature "full circle": The goal is to write haiku with twelve (12) words I will give. It's a kind of word-whirl and you have to use the words given in the clock-wise direction. So every word has to come in the line of it's place on the clock e.g. sunflower you have to use for line one (1) and rain storm for line two (2) and so on.




I will give you twelve (12) words (for every ''hour'') one word. The goal is to write haiku using the words as given in the clock wise way.

Here are the 12 (twelve) words for this new episode:

1. summer love
2. rain storm
3. beach
4. sea shore
5. shells
6. making love
7. garden
8. waterfall
9. stones
10. French kiss
11. sunflower
12. shadow

If you follow the words clock wise than you can compose four new haiku.


French Kiss (credits of photo not known)

This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 5th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish the last "Summer Love" episode later on. For now ... have fun!


Sunday, July 28, 2019

Carpe Diem #1712 twilight


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome a new episode in our wonderful CDHK month about "Summer Love". Today I have chosen for the theme "twilight" that small period between day and night that I find amazing in summer. The last rays of sunlight against the deep blue nightsky. Stars twinkle and the constellations we all know so well are starting to become visible. An amazing time ...

I remember when I was a youngster (say end teens) I lived in a town close to the North Sea and I had my first date with a beautiful girl. She worked at the same institution for the mentally disabled. She really was a gorgeous girl and one day, we both had a few days off, we decided to take a room at a small hotel close to the North Sea. We had a room with a view on the sea ... It was a wonderful, but hot, summer day. The sky was blue without clouds, the sun was downing and the day ran to its end. It was the most wonderful sunset I had ever seen, maybe because I was watching it with her. We sat on the balcony, a glass of white wine in our hands ... It was there that we made love the very first time and that was fantastic, because it was in that strange moment of the day we call "twilight".


Twilight (photo © Joisey Showaa)

An amazing time of the day ... that's for sure, but to create a haiku or tanka with it, will not be easy I think. Well I have given it a try:

in the twilight
only the song of cicadas -
my love's breathing

© Chèvrefeuille

Well ... a nice one I think and now it is up to you. This episode is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will remain open until August 4th at noon (CEST). I will try to publish our new episode later on. For now ... have fun!